Unsigned Bands

Sasha Papernik – Victory (2013)

Sasha Papernik isn’t the first person to attempt to untangle the verities of love in song. Yet Victory, a dark and dangerous piece of noir-inspired songcraft, lures you in anyway.

Tchiya Amet – Celestial Folk Music (2012)

Tchiya Amet creates this interesting subtext, weaving a mystical tapestry of stories, myths, legends and spells through a varied rhythmic landscape. But even if you aren’t familiar with the source material, Celestial Folk Music charms.

The Mickey Finns – Prayers and Idle Chatter (2012)

It’s easy to pigeon-hole the Mickey Finns as a New York City-based Celtic band. You’ve got the fiddle, the drinking songs, a reel and a jig on Prayers and Idle Chatter. But there is a lot more going on here.

George Woods – Heartbeat (2012)

From the quiet affirmations of this album’s opening stringed overture, George Woods sets a mood of heartfelt expectancy. Don’t get too comfy, though.

Emily Hurd – Any Given Day (2012)

With the average Christmas album, you dig it out sometime around Thanksgiving, then stuff it back in with the tinsel and garland sometime around New Year’s Day. Singer-songwriter Emily Hurd may have broken that pattern with Any Given Day.

The MiCKS – The MiCKS EP (2012)

THE MiCKS -“FINISH ME” LIVE @ MAXWELLS CD RELEASE 11/16/12 from Hannah Wylie on Vimeo. An analog recording from Dreamland Studios, this converted West Hurley, NY, church, The MiCKS — raucous, randy, ready to fight — sounds like it could have been made 40 years ago, back before TV singing-contests shaped popular music.

Kalen – Falling from the Sun (2012)

Even as so many singers today seem to be reluctant to give themselves over to the lyric, more concerned with histrionics than connecting on an emotional level, Kalen’s new EP cuts a different path.

Serapicos – Serapicos is a Town (2012)

Gabriel Serapicos sounds like what would happen if the Magnetic Fields starred in a film by Wes Anderson. But even that’s not completely right.

Philipp Gropper’s Philm – Licht (2012)

Many are the jazz adventurers who have run aground on the rocky shoals of the Thelonious Monk sound. They either come off as gimmicky impersonators, the portrait of studied eccentricity, or as well-meaning but genuinely confused – unsure of what to do with all of that dissonance.

Leon Foster Thomas – Brand New Mischief (2012)

The story of Leon Foster Thomas (not to be confused with the late jazz vocalist Leon Thomas) starts on the Caribbean island of Trinidad and continues in Miami.