Post Tagged with: "Robbie Robertson"

Jesse Winchester (1944-2014): An Appreciation

Jesse Winchester (1944-2014): An Appreciation

So, have all your passionate violins play a tune for a Tennessee kid …

Across the Great Divide: Robbie Robertson, “Fallen Angel” from Robbie Robertson (1987)

Across the Great Divide: Robbie Robertson, “Fallen Angel” from Robbie Robertson (1987)

A First Nations-inspired cadence heralds the start of a remarkable collaborative moment, a poignant tribute to a lost friend, and a striking new career path for Robbie Robertson. “Fallen Angel,” the opening track from his long-awaited eponymous solo debut, sounds at once like an archetypical Robertson song and like nothing he’d ever done before.

Across the Great Divide: The Band, “Daniel and the Sacred Harp” from Stage Fright (1970)

Across the Great Divide: The Band, “Daniel and the Sacred Harp” from Stage Fright (1970)

After a series of twilit ruminations, and very dire warnings, about the Band’s new rock-star lifestyle late into Stage Fright, perhaps this utterly scarifying parable was all but inevitable.

‘He would just tear it up’: Robbie Robertson wanted Otis Redding to cover a key Bob Dylan song

‘He would just tear it up’: Robbie Robertson wanted Otis Redding to cover a key Bob Dylan song

Bob Dylan, at Robbie Robertson’s urging, handed one of his most famous songs off to Otis Redding in the hopes that he would do his own Stax-ified version of it. Things didn’t quite work out that way, however.

Across the Great Divide: The Band, “The Shape I’m In” from Stage Fright (1970)

Across the Great Divide: The Band, “The Shape I’m In” from Stage Fright (1970)

“The Shape I’m In,” despite its galloping cadence, finds the Band’s Robbie Robertson desperately attempting to reach out to the badly faltering Richard Manuel.

Across the Great Divide: The Band, “All La Glory” from Stage Fright (1970)

Across the Great Divide: The Band, “All La Glory” from Stage Fright (1970)

Too often, Levon Helm is framed by his country-fried howl, but there was always more to his art — more to his voice, to his persona, to his life.

Across the Great Divide: The Band, “Just Another Whistle Stop” from Stage Fright (1970)

Across the Great Divide: The Band, “Just Another Whistle Stop” from Stage Fright (1970)

A song of dimly lit, strange salvation, “Just Another Whistle Stop” is a gem worth digging up for those who rarely get past the Band’s first two albums.

‘I spent an hour holding his hand’: The Band’s Robbie Robertson on his emotional last meeting with Levon Helm

‘I spent an hour holding his hand’: The Band’s Robbie Robertson on his emotional last meeting with Levon Helm

The Band’s Robbie Robertson was on this way to participate in Rock and Roll Hall of Fame ceremonies when he heard that his longtime former collaborator Levon Helm was near death.

Across the Great Divide: The Band, “Sleeping” from Stage Fright (1970)

Across the Great Divide: The Band, “Sleeping” from Stage Fright (1970)

Richard Manuel’s greatest triumph on Stage Fright, and one of his last signature moments of creativity, arrives with “Sleeping” — as does the growing sense that this is a Band album like no other

Across the Great Divide: The Band, “King Harvest” from The Band (1969)

Across the Great Divide: The Band, “King Harvest” from The Band (1969)

“King Harvest,” the unforgettably sad tale of a besieged farmer, begins not with a scene-setting declaration, but with a quiet sense of forboding — one that returns for its out-of-time chorus