Post Tagged with: "Ornette Coleman"

Pat Metheny – 80/81 (1980): Track by track through a classic

Pat Metheny – 80/81 (1980): Track by track through a classic

Released 35 years ago, ’80/81′ comfortably visits “out” material and more straight ahead jazz, with a healthy introduction to Pat Metheny’s idea of “folk jazz.”

Ornette Coleman and Pat Metheny – Song X (1986): On Second Thought

Ornette Coleman and Pat Metheny – Song X (1986): On Second Thought

Here is a reflection on free jazz pioneer Ornette Coleman and his wonderful 1985 encounter with Pat Metheny, ‘Song X.”

Ornette Coleman, an inscrutable genius, gave jazz its freedom

Ornette Coleman, an inscrutable genius, gave jazz its freedom

There were technical things that made Ornette Coleman’s work great. But stressing that gives away the one thing that really mattered: Its freedom.

WTF?! Wednesdays: John Zorn, “Chronology” from Spy vs. Spy (1989)

WTF?! Wednesdays: John Zorn, “Chronology” from Spy vs. Spy (1989)

I wonder what Ornette thinks of this stuff?

(Cross the) Heartland: Pat Metheny, “Offramp” (1981)

(Cross the) Heartland: Pat Metheny, “Offramp” (1981)

Some think Metheny is joking around, that he couldn’t possibly like “all of this noise.”

(Cross the) Heartland: Pat Metheny, “Pretty Scattered” (1980)

(Cross the) Heartland: Pat Metheny, “Pretty Scattered” (1980)

Sometimes, it’s all about Ornette. On the whole, 80/81 comfortably visits “out” material and more straight ahead jazz, with a healthy introduction to Pat’s idea of “folk jazz.” Some of the glue that holds all of this together is the influence of Ornette Coleman.

The John Lurie National Orchestra – The Invention Of Animals (2014)

John Lurie is a musician, a composer, an accomplished painter, and an actor. For good measure, toss in raconteur and all-around Internet wise guy.

One Step Beyond, Part 2: Sammy Stein on the development of free jazz

This is part two of Sammy Stein’s comprehensive look into the genesis of the rangy improvisational genre of music that eventually became known as free jazz. [Click here for Part 1.]

One Step Beyond: Sammy Stein on the development for free jazz

One Step Beyond: Sammy Stein on the development for free jazz

When I approached my contacts in the music industry with the idea of a series of articles attempting to look at the development of free jazz, many jumped at the chance to offer their thoughts and ideas.

(Cross the) Heartland: Pat Metheny, “Round Trip / Broadway Blues” (1976)

(Cross the) Heartland: Pat Metheny, “Round Trip / Broadway Blues” (1976)

Bright Size Life concludes with Pat finally tipping his hand on his love for Ornette Coleman.

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