Post Tagged with: "One Track Mind"

One Track Mind: Brian Eno + Karl Hyde, “Daddy’s Car” from Someday World (2014)

One Track Mind: Brian Eno + Karl Hyde, “Daddy’s Car” from Someday World (2014)

Just as much as the first track from Brian Eno’s forthcoming collaboration with Underworld’s Karl Hyde was girded by a doomy sense of portent, “Daddy’s Car” is a compulsively listenable ride — all scronky keyboard blips, ass-moving beats and late-night promise.

One Track Mind: Johnny Orr, “We’ll Get By (The Autism Song)” (2014)

One Track Mind: Johnny Orr, “We’ll Get By (The Autism Song)” (2014)

Johnny Orr assumes the role of an autistic boy and says what that boy might say if he were able communicate like a neurotypical kid in his gently swaying ballad, “We’ll Get By (The Autism Song).”

One Track Mind: Don Felder, “Southern Bound” from Road to Forever: Extended Edition (2014)

One Track Mind: Don Felder, “Southern Bound” from Road to Forever: Extended Edition (2014)

Though he’s long been associated with California as a member of the Eagles, Don Felder was born and raised in the swampy milieu of Gainesville, Florida. You get a sense of the profound impact that period had on him (both as a youngster and as a guitarist) via “Southern Bound”

One Track Mind: The Alan Parsons Project, “Fragile” (2014)

One Track Mind: The Alan Parsons Project, “Fragile” (2014)

Draped with a David Gilmour-like diaphanous reverie — fitting, considering the band leader’s connection back to Pink Floyd — “Fragile” illustrates once again how the ever-malleable, at times almost faceless Alan Parsons Project continues through loss.

One Track Mind: Earth Wind and Fire, “Can’t Hide Love” from Essential (2014)

One Track Mind: Earth Wind and Fire, “Can’t Hide Love” from Essential (2014)

This sound, in the dead of night, comes rushing out of my radio — a tornadic gust of horns. Then there follows a devastatingly cool lyric, amid a suave and spacious groove. But who is it? 45 seconds in, I finally peg “Can’t Hide Love” as the new Earth Wind and Fire song; I knew Maurice White’s “yow” anywhere.

One Track Mind: Ian Anderson, “Enter the Uninvited” from Homo Erraticus (2014)

One Track Mind: Ian Anderson, “Enter the Uninvited” from Homo Erraticus (2014)

When all of the talk about concepts and recurring characters is done, an album like Ian Anderson’s forthcoming Gerald Bostock-themed Homo Erraticus must still have the musical goods — must still hold up on its own. The frenzied, very modern creativity surrounding “Enter the Uninvited” signals that it will.

One Track Mind: Nick Drake, “Reckless Jane” from The Phoenix and the Turtle (2014)

One Track Mind: Nick Drake, “Reckless Jane” from The Phoenix and the Turtle (2014)

That there was unheard music from Nick Drake, dead four decades now, is one thing. That is as delicate and funny as “Reckless Jane” makes it all the more of a wonder.

One Track Mind: The Hooters’ David Uosikkinen, “Beat Up Guitar” from Essential Songs of Philadelphia (2014)

One Track Mind: The Hooters’ David Uosikkinen, “Beat Up Guitar” from Essential Songs of Philadelphia (2014)

David Uosikkinen reunites with fellow founding members Rob Hyman and Eric Bazilian for an anthematic reworking of “Beat Up Guitar,” originally the closing track from the Hooters’ folkier, more personal 1989 release Zig Zag. There could perhaps be no better concluding song for Uosikkinen’s new Philly-focused set of songs.

One Track Mind: John Wesley, “Mary Will” from Disconnect (2014)

One Track Mind: John Wesley, “Mary Will” from Disconnect (2014)

A heart-wrenching tale of the search for redemption, with a calescent riff to match, John Wesley’s “Mary Will” is for everyone who ever worried they’d never overcome the mistakes of the past.

One Track Mind: Jack White, “High Ball Stepper” from Lazaretto (2014)

One Track Mind: Jack White, “High Ball Stepper” from Lazaretto (2014)

A gloriously off-kilter instrumental blues from Jack White, “High Ball Stepper” advances the rootsy weirdness that made 2012′s Blunderbuss such a fizzy wonder. It will catch a groove, then devolve into a wide-open space of ruminative piano, then evolve again into a blister of smeared guitar sound. Is there such a thing as prog blues?