Post Tagged with: "John Lee Hooker"

Desert Island Discs: Blues and Blues Rock Edition

Desert Island Discs: Blues and Blues Rock Edition

It probably goes without saying that, once you found yourself stranded on a distant island, there would be blues. And every kind, too — Delta, dirty, city, country, grease-popping, Texas crunching, let-it-all-hang low, you name it.

Otis Taylor, iconoclastic bluesman: Something Else! Interview

Otis Taylor, iconoclastic bluesman: Something Else! Interview

Otis Taylor discusses the state of the blues, career intersections with Tommy Bolin and Gary Moore, and the banjo’s forgotten African-American legacy.

Duke Robillard – Low Down and Tore Up (2011)

Blues records used to routinely sound like this: Loose and fun, almost anarchic in their pursuit of nothing more than good-time joy and real-time emotion.

Something Else! Reviews on the 2009 Blues Hall of Fame honorees

Something Else! Reviews on the 2009 Blues Hall of Fame honorees

by Nick Deriso The Blues Foundation announced its 2009 inductees for the Blues Hall of Fame on Wednesday. Lucky us. We already love ’em: Multiple Grammy Award-winner Taj Mahal; Irma Thomas, the “Soul Queen of New Orleans”; as well as late Chicago bluesman Son Seals and the Reverend Gary Davis. Several singles or album tracks are also set to beRead More

John Lee Hooker – Never Get Out of These Blues Alive (1972)

NICK DERISO: John Lee Hooker, a hypnotically transfixing figure in the blues, made a series of money- and headline-making splashes beginning in 1989 by collaborating with younger artists, beginning with his celebrated record “The Healer.” That one, for instance, included turns with Carlos Santana, Bonnie Raitt, the Rolling Stones’ Keith Richards, Johnnie Johnson, Los Lobos, Robert Cray, George Thorogood andRead More

Branford Marsalis – I Heard You Twice The First Time (1991)

Neatly mixing two of our favorite topics, Branford Marsalis pays no empty lip-service to exploring blues through the jazz idiom here. In fact, you don’t have to listen more than once to hear that’s he’s gone off the deep blue end. Any CD with appearances by B.B. King, Linda Hopkins and John Lee Hooker isn’t playing footsie.

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