Post Tagged with: "Glenn Zaleski"

Mark Zaleski Band – Days, Months, Years (2017)

Mark Zaleski Band – Days, Months, Years (2017)

Varied, inviting, unpredictable but never jarring, the Mark Zaleski Band’s ‘Days, Months, Years’ is anything but boring.

Roxy Coss – Chasing The Unicorn (2017)

Roxy Coss – Chasing The Unicorn (2017)

Roxy Coss shines brightly on ‘Chasing The Unicorn’ because this talented saxophonist and composer shines in so many areas.

Glenn Zaleski – Fellowship (2017)

Glenn Zaleski – Fellowship (2017)

With only two albums to his name alone, Glenn Zaleski is a fully realized talent as a pianist, composer and bandleader. Fellowship is going to delight anybody who relishes Fred Hersch and Keith Jarrett trio records.

Alex LoRe Quartet – More Figs And Blue Things (2016)

Alex LoRe Quartet – More Figs And Blue Things (2016)

‘More Figs And Blue Things’ is the engaging second chapter from the story of the young gifted alto saxophonist Alex LoRe.

Michael Dease – Decisions (2015)

Michael Dease – Decisions (2015)

A model of consistency, style and grace, Michael Dease stays at the head of the class among jazz trombonists with his seventh album, ‘Decisions.’

Glenn Zaleski Trio – My Ideal (2015)

Glenn Zaleski’s debut album ‘My Ideal’ is ideal those who crave well-performed piano trio jazz.

Colin Stranahan, Glenn Zaleski and Rick Rosato – Limitless (2013)

A somewhat reserved recording, Limitless is the second outing for the trio of Colin Stranahan (drums), Glenn Zaleski (piano) and Rick Rosato (bass). The follow-up to 2011’s Anticipation finds the group more evolved in some sense.

Stranahan/Zaleski/Rosato – Limitless (2013)

These days, some piano trios are forward thinking (Vijay Iyer) and others are defiantly and proudly steeped in tradition (Jarrett/Peacock/DeJohnette). The trio started up by Colin Stranahan (drums), Glenn Zaleski (piano) and Rick Rosato (double bass) splits the difference between these two approaches.

Mark and Glenn Zaleski – Duet Suite (2011)

Mark and Glenn Zaleski – Duet Suite (2011)

by Mark Saleski One of the markers of high-level instrumental interplay is the perception of intimacy. We see this again & again in review language — that the musicians seemed as though they were “of one mind,” that their communication was “telepathic.” There are plenty of recorded examples that come to mind: Chick Corea and Herbie Hancock’s An Evening With…,Read More

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