Post Tagged with: "Dylan Sevey"

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “You’re Gonna Get It” (1978)

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “You’re Gonna Get It” (1978)

Petty began to take control of his vocal gifts on the second Heartbreakers album.

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty , “When The Time Comes” from You’re Gonna Get It! (1978)

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty , “When The Time Comes” from You’re Gonna Get It! (1978)

Did Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers fall into “the second-album dilemma”?

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “American Girl” (1976)

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “American Girl” (1976)

What a way to close their self-titled 1976 debut album.

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Luna” (1976)

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Luna” (1976)

The story of “Luna” begins in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Shelter Records, with whom the Heartbreakers were signed when their eponymous debut was released, was founded and run by Denny Cordell (who produced the album) and Leon Russell

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Mystery Man” (1976)

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Mystery Man” (1976)

Tom Petty sets the record straight with Paul Zollo in Conversations With Tom Petty, concerning a very particular label that is often cast upon the Heartbreakers: “We’re always referred to as a Southern band,” he says.

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Fooled Again [I Don’t Like It]” (1976)

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Fooled Again [I Don’t Like It]” (1976)

Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers is, ultimately, an uneven record. Taking their official lineup into account, only eight of the ten tracks can really be considered Heartbreakers songs.

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Strangered In The Night” (1976)

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Strangered In The Night” (1976)

“Strangered In The Night” is the second and final song on Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers that is a leftover from Petty’s solo record sessions, therefore not technically qualifying as a Heartbreakers song.

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “The Wild One, Forever” (1976)

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “The Wild One, Forever” (1976)

Tom Petty has written his fair share of songs about mysterious women: “Magnolia,” “Shadow Of A Doubt (A Complex Kid)” and “A Thing About You” are just a few notable ones. “The Wild One, Forever” was his first, and it is simultaneously one of his greatest love songs and one of his most heartbreaking.

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Hometown Blues” (1976)

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Hometown Blues” (1976)

It’s interesting that “Hometown Blues” is featured on two Heartbreakers best-of compilations — 1995’s five-disc, career-spanning box set Playback and 2000’s double-disc Anthology: Through The Years. Firstly, there are arguably better songs from Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers that didn’t make the cut

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Breakdown” (1976)

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Breakdown” (1976)

“‘Breakdown,’ I wrote that, and we cut it. It was really long. Maybe seven or eight minutes … And somewhere near the end, [Mike] played that lick … Dwight Twilley came in, and when that lick came by, he goes, ‘That’s the lick! Oh man, that’s the lick!’