Post Tagged with: "Classic Rock"

Chicago, “Introduction” from Chicago Transit Authority (1969): Saturdays in the Park

Chicago, “Introduction” from Chicago Transit Authority (1969): Saturdays in the Park

Today, we begin a multi-writer, song-by-song examination of the music of Chicago, and where better to launch than the aptly named “Introduction” from their debut release, ‘Chicago Transit Authority’?

Manassas – Manassas (1972): Shadows in Stereo

Manassas – Manassas (1972): Shadows in Stereo

You have to wonder why Manassas went under so many people’s radar, especially with the gap left by the breakup of Crosby Stills Nash and Young in 1970.

Toto, “Rosanna” from Toto IV (1982): Toto Tuesdays

Toto, “Rosanna” from Toto IV (1982): Toto Tuesdays

Toto’s fourth album represented a major investment for Columbia Records after ‘Hydra’ and ‘Turn Back’ failed to reach the heights of the band’s debut.

Essentials by the Eagles’ Glenn Frey: Gimme Five

Essentials by the Eagles’ Glenn Frey: Gimme Five

Most people associate Glenn Frey with the peaceful, easy country-rock songs with the Eagles. But he also had a gift for R&B and vocal arranging.

The Doors – Morrison Hotel (1970): On Second Thought

The Doors – Morrison Hotel (1970): On Second Thought

There’s nothing forced about 1970’s back-to-basics ‘Morrison Hotel,’ which found the Doors offering blues-battered hard rock with renewed vim and vigor.

ZZ Top – Tejas (1976): Shadows in Stereo

ZZ Top – Tejas (1976): Shadows in Stereo

ZZ Top’s underrated ‘Tejas’ is like a forgotten middle child, having had the back luck to follow not just one, but two classic albums.

Glenn Frey, “The One You Love” from No Fun Aloud (1982): One Track Mind

Glenn Frey, “The One You Love” from No Fun Aloud (1982): One Track Mind

Rather than repeating the Eagles country-rock sound, Glenn Frey’s solo career reverted to his Detroit roots, blending rock, pop and soul.

John Lennon – Menlove Ave (1986): On Second Thought

John Lennon – Menlove Ave (1986): On Second Thought

John Lennon always preferred music raw and natural, and ‘Menlove Ave’ captured him 30 years ago in a thoroughly human moment.

Deep Purple – Who Do We Think We Are? (1973): Shadows in Stereo

Deep Purple – Who Do We Think We Are? (1973): Shadows in Stereo

Not as perfect as ‘In Rock’ and not as successful as ‘Machine Head,’ Deep Purple’s ‘Who Do We Think We Are?’ is often forgotten – but it shouldn’t be.

The Beatles, “Inner Light” (1968): Deep Beatles

The Beatles, “Inner Light” (1968): Deep Beatles

Find out why George Harrison had to be convinced to sing “The Inner Light,” an unlikely b-side to the Beatles’ more commercial “Lady Madonna.”