Post Tagged with: "2010s"

It's A Johnny Butler Two-Fer! Solo and Fracture (by Scurvy)

It's A Johnny Butler Two-Fer! Solo and Fracture (by Scurvy)

by S. Victor Aaron The other day for the first time I heard a song by a certain female vocalist who had just won a Grammy (or maybe 6 or 7 Grammies, for all I know). The only thing I really remember about the song is that her voice was obviously auto-tuned. I thought how odd it was for someoneRead More

Peter Van Huffel – Like The Rusted Key (2010)

Photo: Juan-Carlos Hernandez by S. Victor Aaron In my humble opinion, it’s not the improvised (aka “whack”) jazz that seems toughest to compose and render, nor is it the more mellifluous but intricate modern jazz. Rather, it’s the the kind of jazz that successfully combines both approaches. To me, it’s a marvel how a few talented and visionary musicians canRead More

One Track Mind: Mike LeDonne – "Rock With You" (2010)

One Track Mind: Mike LeDonne – "Rock With You" (2010)

photo: Dan Codazziby Pico This isn’t the first time we’ve featured the Rod Temperton tune made into a 1979 hit by Michael Jackson. But it bears another look, as interpreted by a completely different artist. Pianist and organist Mike LeDonne, a long established fixture in New York’s jazz arena, worked for Roy Eldridge, Milt Jackson and Benny Golson. He evenRead More

John Ellis & Double-Wide – Puppet Mischief (2010)

John Ellis & Double-Wide – Puppet Mischief (2010)

by Pico A new John Ellis CD drops today, which is an occasion to shout an hallelujah or two. And that’s not just because Ellis serves his jazz with heaping spoonfuls of gospel, either. A couple of years ago, one of the of brightest, ascending sax stars today decided to do something that made him really stand out from theRead More

Steve Raegele – Last Century (2010)

Steve Raegele – Last Century (2010)

by S. Victor Aaron They say that writing about music is like dancing about architecture, and if that’s true, then writing about whack jazz can be more like swimming about psychiatry. Often, you can’t describe a melodic or rhythmic structure because there are none. Saying so-and-so sounds like some other so-and-so is sometimes futile; most of the time these guysRead More

Joe Bonamassa – Black Rock (2010)

A year ago, we drooled a little over a power blues record by an ascending star on the blues scene, Joe Bonamassa. Since then The Ballad Of John Henry rocketed to the #1 position on Billboard’s Blues Albums charts, #103 on its Top 200, #35 Rock chart and #1 Heatseekers, in addition to seeing other chart action. Last month thatRead More

Mark Egan – Truth Be Told (2010)

Mark Egan – Truth Be Told (2010)

by Nick DeRiso Perhaps best remembered in jazz circles for his melodic work on the fretless (notably as a member of the Pat Metheny Group from 1977-80), bassist Mark Egan’s earliest influences couldn’t have been more far afield. A former student of Jaco Pastorius at the University of Miami, Egan wanted to emulate Bernard Odum from the classic James BrownRead More

Tineke Postma – The Traveller (2010)

by Pico If I were to tell you that I’m going to discuss the sax playing skills of a certain Dutch lady, you might think I’m talking about Candy Dulfer. Not hardly. Tineke Postma (pronounced TEE-na-ka POST-ma), from Heerenveen, The Netherlands, is an alto and soprano saxophonist who has a much deeper commitment to the straight jazz, and while goingRead More

U.O. Project (Ulysses Owens, Jr.) – It's Time For U (2010)

U.O. Project (Ulysses Owens, Jr.) – It's Time For U (2010)

by S. Victor Aaron Another record by a jazz drummer? Heck yeah! Ulysses Owens, Jr. isn’t just a young up-and-comer percussion specialist with a radiant smile. Behind the cheerful expression is a serious commitment to his craft. A graduate of the world renowned Julliard School, Owens has been touring with Christian McBride and recent Grammy winner Kurt Elling. Before that,Read More

Matt Slocum – Portraits (2010)

Matt Slocum – Portraits (2010)

When you read the liner notes to Matt Slocum’s new record Portraits, it’s full of effusive but knowledgeable praise from one of Slocum’s former instructors at the University of Southern California, where he earned a degree from the prestigious Thornton School of Music. That’s a pretty good reference, but it gains more credence because of two things: the laudatory remarksRead More

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