Capital City Rockets – Capital City Rockets (1973; 2010 reissue)

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This Ohio band announced the return of Jamie Lyons, former lead singer of the Music Explosion, who scored a giant hit with “A Little Bit O’ Fun” in 1967. Future Godz bassist Eric Moore was another noted member of Capital City Rockets.

Initially released on the Elektra label in the summer of 1973, Capital City Rockets (Wounded Bird Records) causes one to wonder how serious these guys really were. Aside from the wet and sloppy performances scattered about the disc, the band’s image drew a great big question mark. Clothed in purple roller derby gear and haircuts deemed horrible even by the era’s standards, the fellows clearly had no fashion sense.

Nevertheless, Capital City Rockers is an enjoyable album. Spurred by a party vibe, the songs are lively and fun to dance to. By cobbling together wobbly boogie beats with strands of bluesy southern-fried samplings, the group was actually a glorified bar band.

Hardly original, Capital City Rockets hijacks moves from a host of different artists, orbiting anywhere from the roots rock sounds of the West Coast hippies to the raw power of the Stooges to the funky pop of King Harvest. In print, such a definition appears disjointed, and although it is true Capital City Rockets seemed to throw ideas at the wall, hoping to see what would stick and work, the record does project a pretty spiffy groove.

Gritty, exaggerated vocals guide the band through roughhewn songs like “Ten Hole Dollars,” “Grab Your Honey” and “Still Kicking,” while “People Are Losing” and “Searchlight” should not be passed over either.

Soon forgotten, Capital City Rockets failed to send the band into the superstar stratosphere, and they eventually broke up.

Founded on reckless energy and raging hormones, rock and roll was intended to be simple, sexy and often silly. And that’s exactly what Capital City Rockets provides. So if three chords, handfuls of grease and lots of grunting and grinding tickle your ears, then here’s the album for you!

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Beverly Paterson

Beverly Paterson

Beverly Paterson was born the day Ben E. King hit No. 4 with "Stand By Me" -- which is actually one of her favorite songs, especially John Lennon's version. She's contributed to Lance Monthly and Amplifier, and served as Rock Beat International's associate editor. Paterson has also published Inside Out, and Twist & Shake. Contact Something Else! at reviews@somethingelsereviews.com.
Beverly Paterson
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