Post Tagged with: "Whack Jazz"

One Track Mind: Ornette Coleman "Voice Poetry" (1975)

by Pico From 1950 to 1975 Harmolodics has always existed in my writing and playing. Yet I did not have a Harmolodic Band to compose and perform with as a working band. I often speak about being a composer that performs without prejudice of environment.–Ornette Coleman, from the Body Meta liner notes. “Harmolodics,” a conception of Coleman’s regarding a basicRead More

One Track Mind: Scorch Trio – "Kjøle Høle" (2004)

by S. Victor Aaron When talking about notable adventurous jazz of any sort that’s being made these days, it’s hard not to mention the Scandinavians. You’ve got your Esborn Svennson Trio (EST), Jaga Jazzist, Bugge Wesseltoft, Nils Petter Molvær, and even old stalwarts like Terje Rypdal and Jan Garbarek who remain vital to the scene. A few years ago, oneRead More

The Nels Cline Singers, Draw Breath (2007)

by S. Victor Aaron Now that Rolling Stone magazine has recently anointed him a “guitar god,” cutting edge guitarist Nels Cline has progressed far beyond his minor icon status of the 1990’s in the Los Angeles experimental music scene to become something of a known quantity among followers of progressive-minded electric guitarists like Bill Frisell, Marc Ribot, James “Blood” UlmerRead More

Forgotten series: Bernie Worrell – Blacktronic Science (1993)

NICK DERISO: From the trembling strains of the first harpsichord notes here, to the rappy backbeat that follows, to the bubbling funk from later on, to the hard jazz moving through this album after that, it’s clear … Bernie Worrell — the original keyboardist with Parliament-Funkadelic— is crazy. But in a good way. And we were only on track four.Read More

One Track Mind: Caspar Brotzmann, "Massaker" (1994)

Sometimes, people listen to music with too much of their brain. I’m just suggesting you give your skull some attention. –zingzing As someone who’s guilty of taking more than a few strolls down the cerebral sidewalk of music, even I’d have to admit you have to keep your cranium happy once in a while. So what does a hopeless art-jazzRead More

One Track Mind: David Torn, "Structural Functions Of Prezens" (2007)

by Pico Since new David Torn releases don’t come around that often–the last one came out in 1998–Christmas arrived last month to lovers of electric improvised music, such as myself. Mark Seleski’s review of Prezens whetted my appetite further as he described the album’s music as “the combination of ambient approach and seemingly unstructured music.” Other musicians pay lip serviceRead More

Gimme Five: Say what?!? Jazz’s most surprising albums

“Jazz is the sound of surprise”–jazz critic Whitney Balliett, 1926-2007 Sometimes you think you know a musician and his tendencies, or that he’s always played the kind of music you’ve known him to play. Over the course of pursuing my curiosity about certain artists, I’ve stumbled upon some rather peculiar recordings that went totally against my preconceptions of the artistRead More

Gimme Five: Five fantastic debut albums of jazz

by Pico A while back we looked at some of jazz’s most notable swan songs, a short, but certainly not complete list of the best last recordings of some jazz greats. So, what about some of the best beginnings? Here I will list five of what I’d consider some of the finest debut albums in jazz. As before, this isn’tRead More

Alice Coltrane (1937-2007) and Michael Brecker (1949-2007): An Appreciation

by S. Victor Aaron The jazz world took a double whammy over the weekend as Alice Coltrane and Michael Brecker passed away. Both of these artists were among my favorites, and like many of others, I’ll miss them and the major contributions they’ve made to the art form. Alice Coltrane was already an accomplished bop pianist when married John ColtraneRead More

One Track Mind: Otomo Yoshihide’s New Jazz Orchestra, "Gazzelloni" (2005)

by S. Victor Aaron Tokyo-based whack jazz guitarist, turntablist, composer, arranger and knob twiddler Otomo Yoshihide has been called the John Zorn of Japan for his love of combining experimental sounds with avant-garde jazz. And to my ears, there’s not much there to dispute the comparison, for better or for worse. His fascination with sine waves can be mind expandingRead More

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