Post Tagged with: "Tom Petty"

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Mystery Man” (1976)

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Mystery Man” (1976)

Tom Petty sets the record straight with Paul Zollo in Conversations With Tom Petty, concerning a very particular label that is often cast upon the Heartbreakers: “We’re always referred to as a Southern band,” he says.

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Fooled Again [I Don't Like It]” (1976)

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Fooled Again [I Don't Like It]” (1976)

Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers is, ultimately, an uneven record. Taking their official lineup into account, only eight of the ten tracks can really be considered Heartbreakers songs.

‘I wanted to do a rock ‘n’ roll record’: Tom Petty previews the Heartbreakers’ upcoming Hypnotic Eye

‘I wanted to do a rock ‘n’ roll record’: Tom Petty previews the Heartbreakers’ upcoming Hypnotic Eye

Tom Petty says he had one main goal in putting together his first album in four years with the Heartbreakers: Getting back to basics.

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Strangered In The Night” (1976)

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Strangered In The Night” (1976)

“Strangered In The Night” is the second and final song on Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers that is a leftover from Petty’s solo record sessions, therefore not technically qualifying as a Heartbreakers song.

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Anything That’s Rock ‘N’ Roll” (1976)

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Anything That’s Rock ‘N’ Roll” (1976)

For as long as rock ‘n’ roll has been around, there have been songs celebrating the genre. In the ’50s, there was “Rock And Roll Music,” “Twenty Flight Rock,” “Rock And Roll Is Here To Stay,” “Seven Nights To Rock,” and “Rock Around The Clock,” among many others.

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “The Wild One, Forever” (1976)

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “The Wild One, Forever” (1976)

Tom Petty has written his fair share of songs about mysterious women: “Magnolia,” “Shadow Of A Doubt (A Complex Kid)” and “A Thing About You” are just a few notable ones. “The Wild One, Forever” was his first, and it is simultaneously one of his greatest love songs and one of his most heartbreaking.

Benmont Tench – You Should Be So Lucky (2014)

Benmont Tench – You Should Be So Lucky (2014)

The songs, after a long time away, just started floating to the surface for Benmont Tench. He’d been a member of Tom Petty’s staggeringly underrated band the Heartbreakers forever, had even had a Nashville writing gig for a time.

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Hometown Blues” (1976)

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Hometown Blues” (1976)

It’s interesting that “Hometown Blues” is featured on two Heartbreakers best-of compilations — 1995’s five-disc, career-spanning box set Playback and 2000’s double-disc Anthology: Through The Years. Firstly, there are arguably better songs from Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers that didn’t make the cut

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Breakdown” (1976)

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Breakdown” (1976)

“‘Breakdown,’ I wrote that, and we cut it. It was really long. Maybe seven or eight minutes … And somewhere near the end, [Mike] played that lick … Dwight Twilley came in, and when that lick came by, he goes, ‘That’s the lick! Oh man, that’s the lick!’

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Rockin’ Around [With You]” (1976)

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Rockin’ Around [With You]” (1976)

As it stands today, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers are one of America’s longest running and most beloved rock ‘n’ roll groups.