Post Tagged with: "Tom Petty"

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “You’re Gonna Get It” (1978)

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “You’re Gonna Get It” (1978)

Petty began to take control of his vocal gifts on the second Heartbreakers album.

One Track Mind: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “U Get Me High” (2014)

One Track Mind: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “U Get Me High” (2014)

The Heartbreakers offer plenty of edge, but what stands out is what’s not there this time.

One Track Mind: Tom Petty, “American Dream Plan B” from Hypnotic Eye (2014)

One Track Mind: Tom Petty, “American Dream Plan B” from Hypnotic Eye (2014)

Tom Petty said his new album was going to rock. And, it’s clear now, he meant it.

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty , “When The Time Comes” from You’re Gonna Get It! (1978)

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty , “When The Time Comes” from You’re Gonna Get It! (1978)

Did Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers fall into “the second-album dilemma”?

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “American Girl” (1976)

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “American Girl” (1976)

What a way to close their self-titled 1976 debut album.

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Luna” (1976)

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Luna” (1976)

The story of “Luna” begins in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Shelter Records, with whom the Heartbreakers were signed when their eponymous debut was released, was founded and run by Denny Cordell (who produced the album) and Leon Russell

On Second Thought: Joni Mitchell – Chalk Mark in a Rainstorm (1988)

On Second Thought: Joni Mitchell – Chalk Mark in a Rainstorm (1988)

The guest-packed Chalk Mark in a Rainstorm represents yet another left turn in Joni Mitchell’s fabled career. Following the release of 1985′s strident and terse Dog Eat Dog, Mitchell and co-producer/bassist Larry Klein return with a lush, sophisticated and elegant work

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Mystery Man” (1976)

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Mystery Man” (1976)

Tom Petty sets the record straight with Paul Zollo in Conversations With Tom Petty, concerning a very particular label that is often cast upon the Heartbreakers: “We’re always referred to as a Southern band,” he says.

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Fooled Again [I Don't Like It]” (1976)

Into the Great Wide Open: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Fooled Again [I Don't Like It]” (1976)

Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers is, ultimately, an uneven record. Taking their official lineup into account, only eight of the ten tracks can really be considered Heartbreakers songs.

‘I wanted to do a rock ‘n’ roll record’: Tom Petty previews the Heartbreakers’ upcoming Hypnotic Eye

‘I wanted to do a rock ‘n’ roll record’: Tom Petty previews the Heartbreakers’ upcoming Hypnotic Eye

Tom Petty says he had one main goal in putting together his first album in four years with the Heartbreakers: Getting back to basics.