Post Tagged with: "The Yes Album"

Yes, “Perpetual Change” from The Yes Album (1971): YESterdays

Yes, “Perpetual Change” from The Yes Album (1971): YESterdays

Yes’ “Perpetual Change” is a wonder of polyrhythms, poetic lyrics, tight harmonies, elegant keys and sometimes melodic, always innovative guitar.

Yes, “A Venture” from The Yes Album (1971): YESterdays

Yes, “A Venture” from The Yes Album (1971): YESterdays

Jon Anderson’s often-forgotten “A Venture” likely would have been a favorite on most prog projects, and that speaks to the strength of ‘The Yes Album.’

Yes, “I’ve Seen All Good People” from The Yes Album (1971): YESterdays

Yes, “I’ve Seen All Good People” from The Yes Album (1971): YESterdays

Yes’ “I’ve Seen All Good People” uses a number of elements not commonly found in rock. But it all comes together to form an unlikely masterpiece.

Yes, “Starship Trooper” from The Yes Album (1971): YESterdays

Yes, “Starship Trooper” from The Yes Album (1971): YESterdays

Yes’ first epic triumph arrives, as contributions by Jon Anderson, Steve Howe and Chris Squire are stitched together to make “Starship Trooper.”

Yes, “Clap” from The Yes Album (1971): YESterdays

Yes, “Clap” from The Yes Album (1971): YESterdays

Initially, it might have been difficult to imagine a three-minute acoustic Yes track having such an impact. Then Steve Howe begins playing “Clap.”

Yes, “Yours is No Disgrace” from The Yes Album (1971): YESterdays

Yes, “Yours is No Disgrace” from The Yes Album (1971): YESterdays

Believed to be Yes’ first anti-war song, “Yours is No Disgrace” features some of Jon Anderson’s most visual, yet compact lyrics.

Jon Anderson, Steve Howe + Tony Kaye on The Yes Album: ‘It was a special time’

Jon Anderson, Steve Howe + Tony Kaye on The Yes Album: ‘It was a special time’

Released this week in 1971, ‘The Yes Album’ was their big-bang moment, a project where the full scope of Yes’ genius began to take shape.

Yes – The Yes Album (1971): On Second Thought

Because I was a huge fan of progressive rock back in the 1970s, I believed I was among music’s most enlightened devotees. My love of prog grew from being a fan of Yes, the sub-genre’s most popular and successful band.

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