Post Tagged with: "Sturgill Simpson"

Fred Phillips’ Best Country and Southern Rock of 2016: Jackson Taylor, Hank Jr., Whiskey Myers

Fred Phillips’ Best Country and Southern Rock of 2016: Jackson Taylor, Hank Jr., Whiskey Myers

A very topical album, a group of overlooked Southern rockers and the return of a country legend highlight this Best Country and Southern Rock of 2016 list.

Fred Phillips’ Best of 2014 (Country + Southern Rock): Bob Wayne, Sturgill Simpson

Fred Phillips’ Best of 2014 (Country + Southern Rock): Bob Wayne, Sturgill Simpson

Bob Wayne, Sturgill Simpson, Whiskey Myers and Whitey Morgan are included in Fred Phillips’ Best of 2014 list for country and Southern rock.

Fred Phillips’ Mid-Year Best of 2014 (Southern Rock and Country): Bob Wayne, Sturgill Simpson, Mat D, Jackson Taylor, Willie Nelson

Fred Phillips’ Mid-Year Best of 2014 (Southern Rock and Country): Bob Wayne, Sturgill Simpson, Mat D, Jackson Taylor, Willie Nelson

Sturgill Simpson? The genuine article. Bob Wayne? Back with his best ever.

Sturgill Simpson – Metamodern Sounds in Country Music (2014)

Sturgill Simpson – Metamodern Sounds in Country Music (2014)

There might not be a more pure and genuine underground country artist.

Fred Phillips’ Best of 2013 (Country and Southern Rock): Shooter Jennings, Sturgill Simpson, Hank III

Fred Phillips’ Best of 2013 (Country and Southern Rock): Shooter Jennings, Sturgill Simpson, Hank III

I certainly don’t claim to be any sort of expert on country music. I’m a metal kid from the sticks who was reintroduced to my country roots through Johnny Cash’s resurgence in the early 1990s.

Fred Phillips’ Mid-Year Best Of 2013 (Country and Southern Rock): Shooter Jennings, Sturgill Simpson

Fred Phillips’ Mid-Year Best Of 2013 (Country and Southern Rock): Shooter Jennings, Sturgill Simpson

I’m pretty picky about my country and Southern rock listening, and to be honest, I don’t explore it as thoroughly as hard rock and metal.

Sturgill Simpson – High Top Mountain (2013)

Sturgill Simpson’s brand of country is undeniably old-fashioned, dripping with honky-tonk spirit, but don’t expect him to try to cash in on it by singing about what an outlaw he is. That’s made clear on the album opener