Post Tagged with: "Robert Johnson"

Eric Clapton’s Me and Mr. Johnson made the case for British blues

Eric Clapton’s Me and Mr. Johnson made the case for British blues

I thought I didn’t need another take on “Come On In My Kitchen.” Eric Clapton’s ‘Me and Mr. Johnson,’ released March 23, 2004, proved me wrong.

Guitars and Gore: Exploring the Horror Themes in Film and Heavy Metal

Guitars and Gore: Exploring the Horror Themes in Film and Heavy Metal

As we all know, the Devil gets the best tunes — and scripts.

The Friday Morning Listen: The Band – Music From Big Pink (1968)

Are you one of those folks who picks music depending on your mood? You’re feeling sort of down so maybe you put on some Robert Johnson or Hank Williams? Maybe loneliness has set in and you need some Belle & Sebastian?

Eric Clapton, playing the blues: Gimme Five

Eric Clapton, playing the blues: Gimme Five

Eric Clapton has certainly done a lot to make us forget his roots in the blues tradition, starting with his turn toward psychedelia in Cream — just a couple of years after a celebrated stint with John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers

Gimme Five: All-time favorite posthumously released albums

The news that there could be as many as two more albums from Amy Winehouse, a year after her passing, got us to thinking about posthumous releases.

Dion – Tank Full Of Blues (2012)

Once a celebrated pre-British Invasion teen idol, Dion Francis DiMucci certainly could have been forgiven for settling into the oldies circuit

Todd Rundgren, “Love in Vain” (2011): One Track Mind

They used to call what Muddy Waters did electric blues. What would that make this sizzling new arc-flash of Todd Rundgren-played Robert Johnson tunes? Electrocuted blues?

Solomon King – Medicine (2011)

Over the course of the striking, stripped-down Medicine, former Detroit autoworker Solomon King returns to that moment when the blues moved inexorably away from the uplift that defined gospel music, and ultimately toward rock ā€˜nā€™ roll and then hip hop.

Gil Scott-Heron (1949-2011): An Appreciation

Musician and street poet Gil Scott-Heron, best known for “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised,” died today. Cause of death was not immediately known; he was 62. Scott-Heron started out at the dawn of the 1970s as a jazz-inclined R&B singer and spoken-word performer, a rapper years before the genre was formally invented. “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” —Read More

Big Head Blues Club – 100 Years Of Robert Johnson (2011)

Big Head Blues Club – 100 Years Of Robert Johnson (2011)

You could argue that Robert Johnson, the doomed 1920s-era Mississippi bluesman, was the first rock ‘n’ roll star. Johnson certainly played the role, with his flair for the dramatic, questionable lifestyle choices and early death. More particularly, he sounded the part: Tough and honest, full of vibrancy, danger and rhythm. Whether you’ve actually ever heard a Robert Johnson record —Read More

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