Post Tagged with: "Revolver"

The Beatles, “For No One” from Revolver (1966): Deep Beatles

The Beatles, “For No One” from Revolver (1966): Deep Beatles

“Why Did It Die?” The Beatles did not write and record a song with that title — right? In truth, they did.

Robert Whitaker

The Beatles: Revelations of ‘Paperback Writer’ and ‘Rain’

Mike Tiano celebrates the 50th anniversary of the Beatles’ landmark single “Paperback Writer/Rain,” while clearing up some misconceptions.

The Beatles, “She Said She Said,” from Revolver (1966): Deep Beatles

The Beatles, “She Said She Said,” from Revolver (1966): Deep Beatles

Like “Tomorrow Never Knows,” “She Said She Said” represents Lennon at his most creative and experimental.

Paul McCartney on the Beatles’ breakthrough with Revolver: ‘Me and John were starting to really cook’

Paul McCartney on the Beatles’ breakthrough with Revolver: ‘Me and John were starting to really cook’

‘Revolver,’ released in America on August 8, 1966, can be seen as the Beatles’ big-bang moment. Paul McCartney says he could see it coming.

The Beatles, “I’m Only Sleeping” from Revolver (1966): Deep Beatles

The Beatles, “I’m Only Sleeping” from Revolver (1966): Deep Beatles

“I’m Only Sleeping,” with its hallucinogenic quality, vivid yet surreal lyrics, creative guitar solo and unusual recording effects, still sounds like no other song in the Beatles’ catalog.

More Perfect Playlists: The Beatles – Revolver (1966)

More Perfect Playlists: The Beatles – Revolver (1966)

Let’s start by getting rid of “Yellow Submarine.” Buy the soundtrack if you feel that strongly about it.

Deep Beatles: “Doctor Robert” from Revolver (1966)

The Beatles recorded their share of mysterious tracks such as “I am the Walrus” or even the self-parody “Glass Onion.” Critics still analyze possible meanings of “Strawberry Fields Forever” or weird experiments like “What’s the New Mary Jane.”

Deep Beatles: “I Want to Tell You” from Revolver (1966)

Deep Beatles: “I Want to Tell You” from Revolver (1966)

As the Beatles’ career progressed, George Harrison gradually developed into a first-class songwriter on a par with the formidable John Lennon/Paul McCartney partnership.

In a new book, Robert Rodriguez makes the case for ‘Revolver’ as the Beatles’ masterwork

In a new book, Robert Rodriguez makes the case for ‘Revolver’ as the Beatles’ masterwork

Robert Rodriguez makes the case for ‘Revolver’ – not its successor, the lavishly praised ‘Sgt. Pepper’s’ – as the Beatles’ game-changing signature work.

The Beatles – Revolver (1966): On Second Thought

The Beatles – Revolver (1966): On Second Thought

The Beatles’ ‘Revolver’ became their best album as the group made its first genuine foray outside of already-comfortable pop-song structures.

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