Post Tagged with: "Pretzel Logic"

Best Miscellaneous Steely Dan Performances: Steely Dan Sunday

Best Miscellaneous Steely Dan Performances: Steely Dan Sunday

Enough gushing about guitars, saxes and drums. Here are Steely Dan’s five best miscellaneous performances, as selected by our panel.

Gimme Five: Cool moments from Steely Dan’s Pretzel Logic

Gimme Five: Cool moments from Steely Dan’s Pretzel Logic

On this date forty years ago, Steely Dan released their third long-player Pretzel Logic, widely regarded as a pinnacle achievement for the premier jazz-pop rock band and one of those great classic rock albums of the 70s.

Steely Dan Sunday: A compilation of all the main entries

Steely Dan Sunday: A compilation of all the main entries

Hard to believe that more than fifteen months ago I embarked on a long-term project reviewing Steely Dan, track-by-track, in the same order within the albums, and chronological order amongst the albums.

Steely Dan Sunday, "Monkey In Your Soul" (1974)

< >> *** STEELY DAN SUNDAY INDEX *** The last track on Pretzel Logic might be my least favorite one of that album, with that over the top fuzzy bass line. To some it makes the song nice ‘n’ fonky but I find it a distraction; I wanna hear Dias and Baxter’s guitars over that noise.

Steely Dan Sunday, "Charlie Freak" (1974)

< >> *** STEELY DAN SUNDAY INDEX *** The art of narration in a song, I would suppose, is one that’s hard to nail down so tight, because when it’s done so well, you remember it.

Steely Dan Sunday, "With A Gun" (1974)

< >> *** STEELY DAN SUNDAY INDEX *** With little apparent interest in pursuing non-ironic love songs, Steely Dan have often touched on themes of criminal activity (hell, I think most of The Royal Scam was about crime). They never pursued the topic with an approving tone, though.

Steely Dan Sunday, “Pretzel Logic” (1974)

Steely Dan Sunday, “Pretzel Logic” (1974)

I never really understood what the heck the story line in this Steely Dan song was really about. The title, I suspect, provides the clue.

Steely Dan Sunday, "Through With Buzz" (1974)

< >> At ninety seconds, it’s the briefest of all Steely Dan songs, and one of only a couple SD recordings where strings accompaniment was used.

Steely Dan Sunday, "Parker's Band" (1974)

< >> *** STEELY DAN SUNDAY INDEX *** Going straight from a tribute to one jazz icon right to a tribute to another jazz icon. Ha, and they call themselves a rock band?

Steely Dan Sunday, "East St. Louis Toodle-oo" (1974)

< >> *** STEELY DAN SUNDAY INDEX *** Some fun facts about this track: 1. “East St. Louis Toodle-oo” is the only Steely Dan track in which Becker and Fagen are not in the songwriting credits. This one was written about fifty years earlier by Duke Ellington and his trumpet player, Bubber Miley.

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