Post Tagged with: "Phil Ochs"

Phil Ochs, “I Ain’t Marching Anymore” (1965): One Track Mind

Phil Ochs, “I Ain’t Marching Anymore” (1965): One Track Mind

Phil Ochs would have – should have – turned 75 today. He’s needed more than ever in a world still on fire with wars and injustice and inequality.

Phil Ochs (1940-1976): An Appreciation

Phil Ochs (1940-1976): An Appreciation

For a while, Phil Ochs’ vision of America fuelled the shared dreams of the 1960s. He would have turned 74 today.

Gimme Five: Songs of despair by Townes Van Zandt, Nick Drake, Phil Ochs, others

Gimme Five: Songs of despair by Townes Van Zandt, Nick Drake, Phil Ochs, others

A visit with singers who know what it means to lose heart.

Phil Ochs – Live Again (2014)

Phil Ochs – Live Again (2014)

We find Phil Ochs sharpening his weapons for a final attack on injustice.

Sammy Walker – Sammy Walker; Blue Ridge Mountain Skyline (2014)

Sammy Walker – Sammy Walker; Blue Ridge Mountain Skyline (2014)

“The jukebox in the café don’t play nothing that I know: Hell, I guess I’ll save my quarter to hear that steam-boat whistle blow”: Sammy Walker’s voice still sounds strong on Blue Ridge Mountain Skyline.

Remembering JFK: Phil Ochs, “That Was The President” and “Crucifixion” (1965, ’67)

Remembering JFK: Phil Ochs, “That Was The President” and “Crucifixion” (1965, ’67)

It was the first time his wife saw him cry. When Phil Ochs heard the news of John F. Kennedy’s assassination, he was inconsolable: “I think I’m going to die tonight, Alice,” he told his wife. “I’m going to die.”

‘One of the greatest who ever lived’: Neil Young shines a spotlight on the underrated Phil Ochs

Neil Young closed his solo set at this year’s Farm Aid with a rendition of “Changes.” Though little known today, Phil Ochs’ romantic ballad once set the heart of many a hippie girl aflame

'Legends of Folk' to feature vintage performances by Bob Dylan, Simon and Garfunkel, Joan Baez, others

A restored and remastered DVD release of Legends of Folk: The Village Scene will feature many of the folk era’s biggest, most influential stars — from Bob Dylan and Simon and Garfunkel, to Peter Paul and Mary to Joan Baez.

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