Post Tagged with: "One Track Mind"

One Track Mind: Keith Jarrett Trio, “Autumn Leaves” (1994)

by S. Victor Aaron That Keith Jarrett, he’s one amazing individual. Consider: · In the middle of the domination of jazz by wanking electric guitarists and keyboardists in 1975, KJ sits down in front of an audience in West Germany armed with only a piano, starts playing whatever came out of his head for about an hour and the recordingRead More

Les McCann + Eddie Harris, “Compared To What” (1969): One Track Mind

Ahhhh, Friday night. As R.L. Burnside would say, “I know godd—ed well it’s party time.” But the blues isn’t the only place you’ll find the Good Lord’s name uttered in vain. Thanks to Les McCann, you can also find that commandment broken in a soul-jazz ditty that he made a classic of the vein. That’s right, you old hippies, youRead More

One Track Mind: Henry Threadgill, "I Can’t Wait To Get Home" (1987)

This week’s single song review shines a light on avant-jazz composer/flautist/altoist Henry Threadgill. A part of the seventies whack jazz movement that brought us such lunimaries as Julius Hemphill, David Murray and the Art Ensemble of Chicaco, Threadgill was one third of the modern creative ensemble Air with bassist Fred Hopkins and percussionist Steve McCall until they called it quitsRead More

Deep Cuts: The Rolling Stones, "Can't You Hear Me Knocking" (1970)

by S. Victor Aaron The critics all declare Exile On Main Street to be The Rolling Stones’ magnum opus. Yeah, it’s a great album alright but for my money, I’ll take the one right before it, Sticky Fingers, anyday. From the sass of “Brown Sugar” to the gentle country of “Wild Horses” the record is mostly a merry celebration ofRead More

Half Notes: The Beatles, "Why Don't We Do It In the Road?" (1968)

by Nick DeRiso Almost certainly written by Paul McCartney in an attempt to mirror some of the heavier, more intellectually raw pieces that John Lennon had begun to craft. Lennon was not outwardly impressed — famously sniffing that it was “the best song Paul ever wrote” — but there are some who think “Why Don’t We Do It?” actually pushedRead More

One Track Mind: Clarence "Gatemouth" Brown – "Monroe, Louisiana" (1975)

by Nick DeRiso “Sitting on a suitcase, in the Memphis depot – wishing to God I could fly,” sings Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown on my old record. “Catching this train is my way of telling Memphis and Mildred goodbye.” People have actually asked me to bring it to parties. The album – and it is an album, on vinyl pressed inRead More