Post Tagged with: "Nick DeRiso"

The Beatles – Revolver (1966): On Second Thought

The Beatles – Revolver (1966): On Second Thought

The Beatles’ ‘Revolver’ became their best album as the group made its first genuine foray outside of already-comfortable pop-song structures.

Lionel Hampton and Friends – Rare Recordings, Vol. 1 (1977)

by Nick DeRiso A line-up from jazzer nirvana is one thing. Wringing such ringing performances out of the guys is quite another. Call this cool vibes from vibrophonist Hampton, who certainly knows where to mail the invitations — a veritable who’s-who of jazz for the newbie: Pianist Hank Jones, trumpeter Thad Jones, pianist Earl “Fatha” Hines, bassist Charlie Mingus, trumpetRead More

The Fireman – Strawberries Oceans Ships Forest (1994)

Capitol Records tried to drop hints that was, in fact, a record by Paul McCartney. Press information shipped with the advance CDs had a pull-out reproduction of a tabloid, apparently circa 1964: “‘Beatlemania,’” the headline screamed, “sweeps U.S.” But the enclosed news release goes on and on about “an anonymous duo” known as the Fireman. No other details given onRead More

Forgotten series: Soul jazz saxophonist Julian ‘Cannonball’ Adderley

by S. Victor Aaron If someone were to ask me who was the best alto sax player ever, I couldn’t at least not heavily consider Cannonball Adderley, the Miles Davis sideman. He had both technique and soul by the sackful. Adderley churned out some fine ones even without the Prince Of Darkness’ help.

Something Else! Featured Artist: Marcia Ball

┬áby Nick DeRiso One of her best Rounder releases, and hilariously named, is “Let Me Play With Your Poodle.” Featured is legendary guitar virtuoso Clarence Holliman, the guy who burned through Bobby “Blue” Bland’s classic 1950s and ’60 sessions. In fact, the old album titles tell it best, when talking about Marcia Ball: “Hot Tamale Baby.” “Gatorhythms.” “Sing It!”

Forgotten series: Coleman Hawkins – Rainbow Mist (1944)

by Nick DeRiso Rainbow Mist, Coleman Hawkins’ 1944 smoker on Delmark, was a brilliant record borne out of boredom. Hawkins, the tenor saxman, had already made his splash with the song “Body and Soul,” back in 1939. When he returned from living in Europe for five years, he took a chance on updating his by-then decrepit standard — stirring inRead More

One Track Mind: Clarence "Gatemouth" Brown – "Monroe, Louisiana" (1975)

by Nick DeRiso “Sitting on a suitcase, in the Memphis depot – wishing to God I could fly,” sings Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown on my old record. “Catching this train is my way of telling Memphis and Mildred goodbye.” People have actually asked me to bring it to parties. The album – and it is an album, on vinyl pressed inRead More

Branford Marsalis – I Heard You Twice The First Time (1991)

Neatly mixing two of our favorite topics, Branford Marsalis pays no empty lip-service to exploring blues through the jazz idiom here. In fact, you don’t have to listen more than once to hear that’s he’s gone off the deep blue end. Any CD with appearances by B.B. King, Linda Hopkins and John Lee Hooker isn’t playing footsie.

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