Post Tagged with: "Nancy Wilson"

Nancy Wilson, “What Are You Doing New Year’s?” (1963): One Track Mind

Nancy Wilson, “What Are You Doing New Year’s?” (1963): One Track Mind

The deeply underrated Nancy Wilson nails the sense of hopeful anxiety that surrounds Dec. 31 every year.

One Track Mind: Nancy Wilson with DIVA, “All My Tomorrows” from A Swingin’ Life (2014)

One Track Mind: Nancy Wilson with DIVA, “All My Tomorrows” from A Swingin’ Life (2014)

She remains a wonder of range and sassy interpretation.

New Music Monday: Santana and Sinead O'Connor, Don Byron and Blue Öyster Cult

New Music Monday beings another truckload of interesting releases, not least of which are Cursive, Don Byron, Mona and Sinead O’Connor

Gimme Five: Christmas music for people who are sick of Christmas music

By now, you’ve probably had just enough of the same old holly jolly stuff. Mark Saleski is here to help with some suggestions from off the beaten path …

Michael Wolff, jazz pianist: Something Else! Interview

Endlessly engaging, Michael Wolff was praised by the New York Times for “near impeccable good taste, technical facility and lyrical inventiveness.”

George Shearing Quintet with Nancy Wilson – The Swingin's Mutual (1961)

George Shearing Quintet with Nancy Wilson – The Swingin's Mutual (1961)

George Shearing, the sightless bebop-influenced pianist best known for the 1952 jazz standard “Lullaby of Birdland,” died today of congestive heart failure at age 91. Here’s a look back at a favorite Shearing release, done alongside singer Nancy Wilson … by Nick DeRiso One of the smartest things Nancy Wilson ever did was start singing at the Blue Morocco inRead More

One Track Mind: Nancy Wilson, "Guess Who I Saw Today" (1961)

NICK DERISO: “Guess Who I Saw Today,” from Nancy Wilson’s second Capitol Records recording “Something Wonderful,” always stops me in my tracks. “You’re so late getting home from the office,” she begins. “Did you miss your train? Were you caught in the rain? No, don’t bother to explain.” And so begins a delicate yet devastating theme of betrayal and comeuppance,Read More

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