Post Tagged with: "Jeff (Skunk) Baxter"

Steely Dan Sunday, “Dallas/Sail The Waterway” (1972)

Steely Dan Sunday, “Dallas/Sail The Waterway” (1972)

At this point, they weren’t quite brilliant yet. But Steely Dan was on its way there.

Doobie Brothers Songs with Jeff “Skunk” Baxter: Gimme Five

Doobie Brothers Songs with Jeff “Skunk” Baxter: Gimme Five

Most fans of the Doobie Brothers seem to have allegiances to particular periods in the band’s 45-year history — with the most common divide being Tom Johnston vs. Michael McDonald.

Steely Dan Sunday, "East St. Louis Toodle-oo" (1974)

< >> *** STEELY DAN SUNDAY INDEX *** Some fun facts about this track: 1. “East St. Louis Toodle-oo” is the only Steely Dan track in which Becker and Fagen are not in the songwriting credits. This one was written about fifty years earlier by Duke Ellington and his trumpet player, Bubber Miley.

Steely Dan Sunday, “The Boston Rag” (1973)

Steely Dan Sunday, “The Boston Rag” (1973)

There aren’t a whole lot of lyrics to this Steely Dan song, but I’ve never been quite able to decipher them. No one else seems to be too sure what they mean, either.

Steely Dan Sunday, “Bodhisattva” (1973)

Steely Dan Sunday, “Bodhisattva” (1973)

A rock song about Buddhism that you can dance the Charleston to, boasting not one but two bad-ass guitar leads? That’s a party tune, Steely Dan style.

Steely Dan Sunday: “Change of the Guard” from Can’t Buy a Thrill (1972)

Steely Dan Sunday: “Change of the Guard” from Can’t Buy a Thrill (1972)

Skunk Baxter was just beginning to make his mark in 1972, but it was already evident that Steely Dan landed the right man for the job.

Steely Dan Sunday: “Brooklyn” from Can’t Buy a Thrill (1972)

Steely Dan Sunday: “Brooklyn” from Can’t Buy a Thrill (1972)

I don’t know how many Steely Dan fans are also into country music, but “Brooklyn” showed the two seemingly opposed passions could co-exist quite nicely.

Steely Dan Sunday: “Only a Fool Would Say That” from Can’t Buy a Thrill (1972)

Steely Dan Sunday: “Only a Fool Would Say That” from Can’t Buy a Thrill (1972)

More than any other track from their debut album, “Only a Fool Would Say That” points the way to what Steely Dan would evolve into.

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