Post Tagged with: "Guitar gods"

Movies: Jimi Hendrix – The Guitar Hero (2010)

“The Guitar Hero” moves away from the tabloid side of the Jimi Hendrix myth, instead delving into the American guitarist’s sweeping impact on rock music and the instrument. That makes director Jon Brewer’s film not so much a biography, per se, as it is tone-poem love letter to Hendrix’s muse, and how it finally ignited. I think, at this lateRead More

Neil Haverstick – Fretless (2010)

Neil Haverstick – Fretless (2010)

by Mark Saleski If you have a few hours to spare, and are looking for some cheap entertainment, search for one of those “Best Guitarists” lists on the Internet. Oh dear, the comments will absolutely slay you with their hilarity. Just about everybody can find a way to be offended that their “Best” has been slighted in one way orRead More

Forgotten series: Led Zeppelin – Presence (1976)

Forgotten series: Led Zeppelin – Presence (1976)

by Nick DeRiso Led Zeppelin wasn’t always this thundering, then nimble, amalgamation. The band’s first album had, on its surface, only a copycat kind of appeal. Recorded over just 30 hours, these songs were presented in the same way Zeppelin would have done them on stage at the time — half rendition, half sweaty tribute. They were, as much asRead More

Deep Cuts: Pink Floyd – "One of My Turns" (1979)

Deep Cuts: Pink Floyd – "One of My Turns" (1979)

by Nick DeRiso All apologies to Roger Waters, who’s dragging it back on the road for a series of 30th anniversary concert performances, but I was never all that into Pink Floyd’s “The Wall.” Too much talking, not enough — you know — music. While working out issues in dealing with a meteoric rise to fame as an adult afterRead More

Half Notes: Buckethead – Shadows Between The Sky (2010)

by S. Victor Aaron Guitar whiz Buckethead has built a loyal following primarily by virtue of his fretted pyrotechnics. Among the several records he makes every year are the mellower, dulcet types that range from ambient to instrumental pop. In some ways , this toned-down record by a fiery guitarist has some parallels you could draw with Jeff Beck’s upcomingRead More

Half Notes: Jeff Beck – Emotion and Commotion (2010)

by S. Victor Aaron This one’s not dropping until April 13 and I’ve listened to it only a few times, but I think it’s a pretty easy album to peg. This is one Jeff Beck long player where there’s a lot more emotion happening than commotion. The stomping blues-rock fusion of “Hammerhead” excepted, much of the record recalls the slower,Read More

J.J. Cale – Roll On (2009)

J.J. Cale – Roll On (2009)

The question for rock musicians has always been how they might navigate into middle age, and later. No previous format — from country pickers to down home blues men to doomed jazzmen — was so inextricably tied into youth. That makes the lasting relevance of J.J. Cale, 70 now, all the more notable: “Who knew?” he admits during a chuggingRead More

One Track Mind: Jeff Beck/Tal Wilkenfeld, "Cause We've Ended As Lovers" (2008)

One Track Mind: Jeff Beck/Tal Wilkenfeld, "Cause We've Ended As Lovers" (2008)

by S. Victor Aaron Jeff Beck has long been at or near the top of a lot of people’s greatest guitarists lists and it’s not hard to see why. He’s a master technician, and possesses a highly unique, blues-based style that no one has even really come close to duplicating. And he can traverse rock, blues and jazz with equalRead More

Sonny Boy Williamson II with Eric Clapton, Willie Dixon and Otis Spann – In Europe (1995)

Sonny Boy Williamson II with Eric Clapton, Willie Dixon and Otis Spann – In Europe (1995)

A rakish character, to be sure, Sonny Boy Williamson II wore a bowler hat and custom-made two-tone three-piece suit, often regaled the crowds with a hands-free harp solo, even took the name of a once-more famous predecessor in order to jump start his career. Williamson, then, was the perfect America export, over the top and completely original. More particularly, heRead More

Forgotten series: Eric Clapton – Pilgrim (1998)

Forgotten series: Eric Clapton – Pilgrim (1998)

“Pilgrim” — Eric Clapton’s first album of original material since 1989′s “Journeyman” — was, on its face, a sharp, brave attempt at modernizing the guitarist’s core sound. You hear solid licks situated amongst the prevailing R&B production values of today — keyboards and drum programming, both swirling orchestrations and smooth female backing vocals, these car-frame rattling bass beats. But theRead More