Post Tagged with: "Gimme Five"

Gimme Five: Jazz’s greatest last recordings

“Thank you very much, you make me feel so wonderful. It’s been a pleasure being here but I really must go now, it’s so hot.” Clifford Brown at the end of his final performance, June 25, 1956 Jazz history is full of personal tragedies; so many of the greats who for various reasons, left us far too soon. For someRead More

Gimme Five: Overlooked jazz guitar recordings by Emily Remler, Larry Coryell, Pat Martino, Danny Gatton, John McLaughlin

by S. Victor Aaron My look at jazz guitar records that didn’t get their due.

Gimme Five: Overlooked jazz piano recordings by Bill Evans, Chick Corea, Keith Jarrett, Herbie Hancock, Dave Brubeck

We already did piano men, but they were all by underrecognized artists. Now, it’s time to look at albums by the big names that didn’t get the kudos of their better known companions, but should have:

Gimme Five: Jazz saxophonist Joe Henderson

On June 30, 2001, tenor saxophonist great Joe Henderson passed away. Among one of the giants in a crowded field of post-bop saxmen who sprang up in the fifities and sixties, Henderson nonetheless never got his due until nearly a quarter century after his superb 1963 debut Page One.

Gimme Five: Overlooked jazz woodwind recordings by Art Pepper, Paul Gonsalves, Roland Kirk, Eric Dolphy, Sonny Stitt

by S. Victor Aaron Some favorite jazz albums of mine that don’t come up at the top of anyone else’s top records list, but I thought were outstanding despite the lack of publicity about them. …

Gimme Five: Overlooked jazz organists Larry Goldings, Big John Patton, Charles Earland, Larry Young, Lonnie Smith

by S. Victor Aaron Here, we take a look at the mighty Hammond B-3. To make it a bit challenging, no records by the organ jazz godfather Jimmy Smith will be on the list.

Gimme Five: Funky records from Herbie Hancock, Jeff Lorber, Grover Washington Jr., The Crusaders, David Sanborn

This time we look at albums with grooves in the pocket even if they weren’t much in the press: 1) Herbie Hancock, Mr. Hands (1980)The seventies began very creatively for HH, first with the space funk Mwandishi albums followed by the better-known Head Hunters period that firmly eastablished Herbie’s pre-eminance in synthesized instrumental funk. But as the decade wore on,Read More

Gimme Five: Overlooked Miles Davis recordings

Another in a series of overlooked jazz classics. This time we look at diamonds in the rough by perhaps the single most influential figure in jazz since World War II: Miles Davis. A high profile artist whose work has been picked apart as much as Davis’ won’t have a lot of unturned stones despite some 45+ years of recording history.Read More

Close