Post Tagged with: "Fusion Jazz"

Bill Frisell – All We Are Saying (2011)

The thing that makes today’s release of All We Are Saying feel so connective is guitarist Bill Frisell‘s willingness to simply let things happen — to accept life as it goes.

Dave Douglas – Freak In (2003)

by Tom Johnson In many ways, I am still no closer to being able to put words to my feelings for this album. Instead, I find myself forcing words upon it, all of which are rendered meaningless because they really don’t describe this album, only things that have come before it.

Stanley Jordan – Friends (2011)

A sharper direction on this new release, not to mention an all-star backing cast, helps Stanley Jordon overcome many of the stereotypes that have dogged him since rising to fame in the early 1980s. Back then, Jordan was riding a wave of attention over his use of a eye-poppingly fast guitar string-tapping technique, but ultimately — save for a fewRead More

Ramsey Lewis – Ramsey, Taking Another Look (2011)

I skipped right to this album’s new edit of “Sun Goddess,” a timelessly accessible 1970s R&B fusion number — already singing the familiar wordless chorus from the original by Ramsey Lewis with Earth Wind and Fire

One Track Mind: Pat Metheny Group, "Third Wind" (1987)

I like a good guitar solo as much as the next guy, but given a choice between a display of fretboard pyrotechnics vs. something with a little more soul, I’ll always gravitate to the latter.

Forgotten series: Matthew Shipp – Nu Bop (2003)

by Tom Johnson Jazz has been in a kind of holding pattern since the mid-1970s, when even Miles Davis declared the genre dead.

Joey Baron – Tongue In Groove (2004)

by Tom Johnson Drummer Joey Baron’s Barondown, featuring Steve Swell on trombone and Ellery Eskelin on tenor sax comes across like the mischievous little brother to John Zorn’s Masada.

Avishai Cohen – After The Big Rain (2007)

by Mark Saleski Reviewers sometimes get too caught up playing the label game: jazz, pop, world (ah, the ambiguous catch-all label), rock, ambient. Whenever a writer struggles with material that lacks a definite musical anchor, I am reminded of the transformation seen through Miles Davis’ electric years.

Exegesis – The Harmony Of The Anomaly (2011)

Electronic and eclectic, Exegesis represents one of the latest attempts to marry technology to the spirit of jazz.

Jeff Coffin and the Mu'tet – Live! (2011)

Saxophonist and composer Jeff Coffin, a three-time Grammy winner, traverses a fine line on Live!, a record that feels both timeless and fresh. The beauty is that he and his Mu’Tet don’t stumble into the pitfalls of either concept.