Post Tagged with: "Frank Rosaly"

Jason Stein, Paul Giallorenzo and Frank Rosaly – Hearts and Minds (2016)

Jason Stein, Paul Giallorenzo and Frank Rosaly – Hearts and Minds (2016)

Not always tuneful but unfailingly engaging and playful, ‘Hearts and Minds’ exemplifies the best qualities of adventurous Chicago jazz.

S. Victor Aaron’s Top Unreviewed Jazz and Fusion Records of 2013: Ivo Perelman, Frank Rosaly

S. Victor Aaron’s Top Unreviewed Jazz and Fusion Records of 2013: Ivo Perelman, Frank Rosaly

So many great records to rave about…and so little time to rave. Last year I started a new tradition with a “just one more list before we’re done with lists” kind of list.

Aerophonic Records Two-fer: The Rempis Percussion Quartet – Phalanx; and Wheelhouse – Boss of the Plains (2013)

Earlier this year Chicago saxophonist Dave Rempis launched his own record label Aerophonic to serve as the main home for his various projects and the first two of these recordings are hittin’ the streets

Josh Berman & His Gang – There Now (2012)

Josh Berman follows up a debut album that brilliantly collided the very old with the very new, mainly by expanding the harmonic range of his band. Old Idea, which cleverly retrofitted trad jazz with a healthy dose of Bill Dixon, announced to the world that Chicago is big enough for another forward-thinking cornetist (alongside electro-acoustic genius Rob Mazurek).

One Track Mind: Jason Stein Quartet, "Work" (2011)

One of the more distinctive and convincing points made by Ted Gioia in his definitive chronicle of jazz, The History of Jazz (1997, rev. 2011, Oxford University Press) is about the under-credited impact pianist Lennie Tristano made

Half Notes: Rempis/Rosaly – Cyrillic (2010)

by Mark Saleski Saxophonist Dave Rempis’ co-conspirator on drums, Frank Rosaly, lays down some solid grooves and textures. Nothing here is quite as chaotic as say, Interstellar Space, but the music isn’t exactly subdued either. Rempis displays some impressive extended technique on tunes like “How to Cross When Bridges Are Out,” with Rosaly providing both implied rhythmic structure as wellRead More

Close