Post Tagged with: "Folk Rock"

Ethan Keller – Dead Man Dancing (2016)

Ethan Keller – Dead Man Dancing (2016)

‘Dead Man Dancing’ is Ethan Keller up close and personal, warts and all. And you know what? He’s still sounding good.

Indigo Girls, “The Rise of the Black Messiah” from One Lost Day (2015): One Track Mind

Indigo Girls, “The Rise of the Black Messiah” from One Lost Day (2015): One Track Mind

The most tragic histories can make the greatest songs, as the Indigo Girls’ “Rise of the Black Messiah” reminds us.

The Byrds’ Turn! Turn! Turn! offered a message of hope in troubled times

The Byrds’ Turn! Turn! Turn! offered a message of hope in troubled times

50 years ago, ‘Turn! Turn! Turn!’ captured both the political and musical climate of the era – even as it confirmed the Byrds’ ascension.

Lucinda Williams – Down Where the Spirit Meets the Bone (2014)

Lucinda Williams – Down Where the Spirit Meets the Bone (2014)

Lucinda Williams’ ‘Down Where the Spirit Meets the Bone’ is an expection to the rule of double albums being full of filler. This one is all killer.

Derek Fawcett – Feel Better (2014)

Fawcett’a songs possess the depth, maturity and easily engaging quality lacking from other singer-songwriters these days.

J.D. Souther, “I’ll Be Here At Closing Time” (2008): One Track Mind

J.D. Souther, “I’ll Be Here At Closing Time” (2008): One Track Mind

Souther is one of the best in the business at telling stories, period.

Tommy Malone – Poor Boy (2014)

While the legacy of the Subdudes is firmly cemented as one of the uplifting and satisfying supergroups in recent roots music history, its front man is busy building upon his own legacy.

Something Else! sneak peek: Tommy Malone, “You May Laugh” from Poor Boy (2014)

Tommy Malone might forever be known as a founder and frontman for the widely admired subdudes, but as he reminded us last year with his first solo effort in ages, Natural Born Days,

Nate Jones Band – The Nate Jones Band EP (2014)

Let’s face it, the criteria of what makes a good singer-songwriter record are usually straightforward: does the singer-songwriter sing well and two, does he sing good songs?

‘It was just a thrill to play’: Roger McGuinn on the Byrds’ breakthrough Bob Dylan interpretation

‘It was just a thrill to play’: Roger McGuinn on the Byrds’ breakthrough Bob Dylan interpretation

The Byrds’ breakthrough single, a charttopping 1965 version of Bob Dylan’s “Mr. Tambourine Man,” came to them almost by accident — and created quite a rift along the way.