Post Tagged with: "Eivind Opsvik"

Vinnie Sperrazza Apocryphal – Hide Ye Idols (2017)

Vinnie Sperrazza Apocryphal – Hide Ye Idols (2017)

Vinnie Sperrazza and his audacious crew once again stretch jazz across multiple red lines and force people to rethink what defines that idiom.

Brandon Seabrook – Die Trommel Fatale (2017)

Brandon Seabrook – Die Trommel Fatale (2017)

Always crazy like a fox, Brandon Seabrook might have again made radical art with ‘Die Trommel Fatale,’ but it’s art with plenty of purpose, vision and balls.

Eivind Opsvik – Overseas V (2017)

Eivind Opsvik – Overseas V (2017)

‘Overseas V’ is part of the wild, woolly world of Eivind Opsvik that fans of the unconventional will want to partake.

Eivind Opsvik,  “Brraps!” from Overseas V (2017): Something Else! exclusive stream

Eivind Opsvik, “Brraps!” from Overseas V (2017): Something Else! exclusive stream

In the exclusive premiere of Eivind Opsvik’s “Brraps!”, the guy making those deft moves on the double bass is the same one wearing a raincoat making deft dance moves in his living room.

Adam Schneit, “A Clearer View” from Light Shines In (2016): Something Else! exclusive stream

Adam Schneit, “A Clearer View” from Light Shines In (2016): Something Else! exclusive stream

Adam Schneit keeps the Neil Young-like melody of “A Clearer View” melody well within sight while retaining the immediacy of a good Young song without needing lyrics to get that across.

Vinnie Sperrazza – Apocryphal (2014)

Yes, ‘Apocryphal’ is ethereal, an adjective that might be overused a tad, but it’s all about the way Vinnie Sperrazza and his three accomplices give the music that quality. It puts Sperrazza’s formal debut in a far corner of jazz that’s rarely occupied with so much moxie.

Pete Robbins – Pyramid (2014)

As a bandleader and award-winning composer, saxophonist Pete Robbins never stands still, crafting each album using some different dimension.

Mike Pride – Drummer’s Corpse (2013)

Albums with as many songs as a 45 single are bound to be interesting, and that’s undeniably the case for Mike Pride’s dual epic numbers compiled into his upcoming Drummer’s Corpse album.

Jeremy Udden – Folk Art (2012)

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=di2EmyzCmdw&w=420&h=315] As one of jazz’s more restless saxophonists of his generation, Jeremy Udden has moved from the “melodic jazz-rock” of his Torchsongs ensemble to the country/folk-inflected jazz of Plainville.

S. Victor Aaron’s Top Albums for 2012, Part 3 of 4: Whack Jazz

<<< Part Two, Mainstream and Modern Jazz ||| Part 4, Fusion Jazz >>> In continuing with a long-held tradition, I’ve parsed out the jazz that goes avant-garde from the more conventional stuff.

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