Post Tagged with: "Deep Beatles"

Deep Beatles: “Cry Baby Cry” from The Beatles (1968)

Deep Beatles: “Cry Baby Cry” from The Beatles (1968)

John Lennon may have called it “a piece of rubbish,” but “Cry Baby Cry” symbolizes one of Lennon’s more underrated compositions. Written while in India, “Cry Baby Cry” serves as a twisted nursery rhyme, and he would return to the motif years later on Double Fantasy’s “Cleanup Time.” The 1968 tune landed on the White Album, and still intrigues withRead More

Deep Beatles: “Free as a Bird” from Anthology 1 (1995)

Deep Beatles: “Free as a Bird” from Anthology 1 (1995)

The anniversary celebrations abound everywhere: 50 years ago, the Beatles first reached American shores, debuted on Ed Sullivan, and officially kicked off the Beatlemania era.

Deep Beatles: The Beatles, “Her Majesty” from Abbey Road (1969)

Deep Beatles: The Beatles, “Her Majesty” from Abbey Road (1969)

Concluding our walk through the Abbey Road medley is the brief, secret coda “Her Majesty.” At only 23 seconds, it stands as the shortest song in the Beatles catalog.

Deep Beatles: “The End,” from Abbey Road (1969)

Deep Beatles: “The End,” from Abbey Road (1969)

The final section of the Abbey Road medley also symbolizes the Beatles winding down their careers.

Deep Beatles: “Carry That Weight,” from Abbey Road (1969)

Deep Beatles: “Carry That Weight,” from Abbey Road (1969)

Continuing the melancholic mood set by “Golden Slumbers,” “Carry That Weight” further stresses the turmoil the Beatles were experiencing by 1969.

Deep Beatles: “Golden Slumbers,” from Abbey Road (1969)

Deep Beatles: “Golden Slumbers,” from Abbey Road (1969)

One of the most tender and moving sections of the Abbey Road medley, “Golden Slumbers” features Paul McCartney at his best.

Deep Beatles: “She Came In Through The Bathroom Window” from Abbey Road (1969)

Deep Beatles: “She Came In Through The Bathroom Window” from Abbey Road (1969)

The next entry in the Abbey Road medley continues the naughtiness of “Polythene Pam.”

Deep Beatles: “Polythene Pam” from Abbey Road (1969)

Deep Beatles: “Polythene Pam” from Abbey Road (1969)

One of John Lennon’s more underrated compositions, “Polythene Pam” fits perfectly with the preceding Abbey Road fragment “Mean Mr. Mustard.”

Deep Beatles: “Mean Mr. Mustard,” from Abbey Road (1969)

Deep Beatles: “Mean Mr. Mustard,” from Abbey Road (1969)

As “Sun King” quietly fades, a drum kickstarts this darkly humorous track: “Mean Mr. Mustard,” a John Lennon composition dating to 1968. His own harshest critic, Lennon later labeled it a “piece of garbage.”

Deep Beatles: “Sun King” from Abbey Road (1969)

Deep Beatles: “Sun King” from Abbey Road (1969)

Next in the Abbey Road medley is one of the Beatles’ most beautiful yet mysterious tracks, “Sun King.” In later years, John Lennon dismissed “Sun King” as “a piece of garbage I had around,” but its lovely harmonies and mystical lyrics transform it into an entrancing listening experience.