Post Tagged with: "Deep Beatles"

Deep Beatles: “She Came In Through The Bathroom Window” from Abbey Road (1969)

Deep Beatles: “She Came In Through The Bathroom Window” from Abbey Road (1969)

The next entry in the Abbey Road medley continues the naughtiness of “Polythene Pam.”

Deep Beatles: “Polythene Pam” from Abbey Road (1969)

Deep Beatles: “Polythene Pam” from Abbey Road (1969)

One of John Lennon’s more underrated compositions, “Polythene Pam” fits perfectly with the preceding Abbey Road fragment “Mean Mr. Mustard.”

Deep Beatles: “Mean Mr. Mustard,” from Abbey Road (1969)

Deep Beatles: “Mean Mr. Mustard,” from Abbey Road (1969)

As “Sun King” quietly fades, a drum kickstarts this darkly humorous track: “Mean Mr. Mustard,” a John Lennon composition dating to 1968. His own harshest critic, Lennon later labeled it a “piece of garbage.”

Deep Beatles: “Sun King” from Abbey Road (1969)

Deep Beatles: “Sun King” from Abbey Road (1969)

Next in the Abbey Road medley is one of the Beatles’ most beautiful yet mysterious tracks, “Sun King.” In later years, John Lennon dismissed “Sun King” as “a piece of garbage I had around,” but its lovely harmonies and mystical lyrics transform it into an entrancing listening experience.

Deep Beatles: “Because” from Abbey Road (1969)

For the next several columns, I will closely examine the legendary Abbey Road medley, their 16-minute magnum opus comprised of numerous song fragments. Where did these short works come from? How did they fit together so flawlessly?

Follow Something Else! columnist Kit O’Toole for the latest from Chicago’s Fest for Beatles Fans

Follow Something Else! columnist Kit O’Toole for the latest from Chicago’s Fest for Beatles Fans

Something Else! Reviews’ own Kit O’Toole once again brings you all the latest from this weekend’s Fest for Beatles Fans in Chicago, highlighted by her appearance in a pair of interesting panel discussions.

Deep Beatles: “Hey Bulldog” from Yellow Submarine (1968)

Years after the Beatles recorded the Yellow Submarine track “Hey Bulldog,” John Lennon casually described the song as “a good sounding record that means nothing.”

Deep Beatles: “Kansas City/Hey-Hey-Hey-Hey!” (Cavern Club version, 1962)

What is a well-known Beatles track like “Kansas City/Hey-Hey-Hey-Hey!” doing in a column called “Deep Beatles”? After all, their cover has appeared on official releases three times: Beatles for Sale, Live at the BBC, and Anthology 1.

Deep Beatles: “Doctor Robert” from Revolver (1966)

The Beatles recorded their share of mysterious tracks such as “I am the Walrus” or even the self-parody “Glass Onion.” Critics still analyze possible meanings of “Strawberry Fields Forever” or weird experiments like “What’s the New Mary Jane.”

Deep Beatles: Paul McCartney, “Flaming Pie” from Good Evening New York City (2009)

Our series on live Paul McCartney concludes with a perfect example of how live recordings often improve upon studio versions. Some artists use concerts as an occasion to play deep album tracks that may have been unfairly overlooked