Post Tagged with: "David Sanborn"

One Track Mind: Bobby Hutcherson, David Sanborn + Joey DeFrancesco, “Delia” (2014)

This is one finger-licking, chin-wagging, cool-side-of-the-pillow triumph.

Gimme Five: 1980s smooth jazz albums that don’t, you know, suck

How do you react when you hear or read the term “smooth jazz”? Does it conjure up visions of Kenny G flittering up and down scales as he’s swaying with his long, curly locks tousling about and holding his straight sax off to the side of his mouth?

Bob James and David Sanborn – Quartette Humaine (2013)

Bob James and David Sanborn – Quartette Humaine (2013)

Apart, and most certainly together, Bob James and David Sanborn have most often been associated with a sound more easy-going and palatable than necessarily challenging. Not here.

Tommy Bolin – The Ultimate Teaser (2012)

Arriving between stints with the James Gang, Billy Cobham and then Deep Purple, Teaser stands as the first, best testament to the roving genius that was doomed guitarist Tommy Bolin.

Phil Collins – Live at Montreux (2012)

If somebody told me, before a 1996 concert, that Phil Collins was going to be performing “Los Endos” — the closing track from 1976’s A Trick of the Tail, Genesis’ first project after Peter Gabriel’s departure — I would have been thrilled.

Gimme Five: Underrated examples of when jazz guys got funky

A look at five jazz albums with grooves in the pocket — even if they weren’t much in the press.

Gimme Five: Say what?!? Jazz music's most surprising albums

“Jazz is the sound of surprise.” — jazz critic Whitney Balliett, 1926-2007

Ween – La Cucaracha (2007)

by Tom Johnson It had been four long years since Ween graced us with a new album of weirdness. In that time, they did slip out the fantastic Shinola Vol. 1, a collection of odds and ends that includes their Pizza Hut jingle that apparently didn’t go over so well

Saxophonist David Sanborn: Gimme Five

Saxophonist David Sanborn: Gimme Five

Often situated in a cloud of opaque neo-funk, David Sanborn’s talents can be understandably obscured. Yet, there’s no mistaking, or escaping, that tone.

One Track Mind: David Sanborn "I Told U So" (1983)

One Track Mind: David Sanborn "I Told U So" (1983)

As the seventies turned into the eighties, crossover jazz was rapidly morphing into what’s now known as “smooth” jazz (I once heard it described as “sprout” jazz, as in, the music preferred by “those who like that kind of music also like bean sprouts on their cheeseburgers,” but that’s for another discussion). Whatever you call it, one of the majorRead More