Post Tagged with: "Can’t Buy A Thrill"

Steely Dan Sunday: A compilation of all the main entries

Steely Dan Sunday: A compilation of all the main entries

Hard to believe that more than fifteen months ago I embarked on a long-term project reviewing Steely Dan, track-by-track, in the same order within the albums, and chronological order amongst the albums.

Steely Dan Sunday: “Turn That Heartbeat Over Again” from Can’t Buy a Thrill (1972)

Steely Dan Sunday: “Turn That Heartbeat Over Again” from Can’t Buy a Thrill (1972)

Even in Steely Dan’s misfires, there was a high level of sophistication and craftsmanship. But I still don’t care much for this song.

Steely Dan Sunday: “Change of the Guard” from Can’t Buy a Thrill (1972)

Steely Dan Sunday: “Change of the Guard” from Can’t Buy a Thrill (1972)

Skunk Baxter was just beginning to make his mark in 1972, but it was already evident that Steely Dan landed the right man for the job.

Steely Dan Sunday: “Brooklyn” from Can’t Buy a Thrill (1972)

Steely Dan Sunday: “Brooklyn” from Can’t Buy a Thrill (1972)

I don’t know how many Steely Dan fans are also into country music, but “Brooklyn” showed the two seemingly opposed passions could co-exist quite nicely.

Steely Dan Sunday: “Fire In the Hole” from Can’t Buy a Thrill (1972)

Steely Dan Sunday: “Fire In the Hole” from Can’t Buy a Thrill (1972)

All hail chief engineer Roger Nichols, referred to in the album credits since Steely Dan’s debut as “The Immortal.”

Steely Dan Sunday: “Only a Fool Would Say That” from Can’t Buy a Thrill (1972)

Steely Dan Sunday: “Only a Fool Would Say That” from Can’t Buy a Thrill (1972)

More than any other track from their debut album, “Only a Fool Would Say That” points the way to what Steely Dan would evolve into.

Steely Dan Sunday: “Midnite Cruiser” from Can’t Buy a Thrill (1972)

Steely Dan Sunday: “Midnite Cruiser” from Can’t Buy a Thrill (1972)

Steely Dan’s “Midnite Cruiser” remains the song Jim Hodder is most remembered by. And it’s a fine way to be remembered.

Steely Dan Sunday: “Kings” from Can’t Buy a Thrill (1972)

Steely Dan Sunday: “Kings” from Can’t Buy a Thrill (1972)

Here’s an early indication that Steely Dan wasn’t going to dwell on romantic themes in their lyrics.

Steely Dan Sunday: “Dirty Work” from Can’t Buy a Thrill (1972)

Steely Dan Sunday: “Dirty Work” from Can’t Buy a Thrill (1972)

Some of the earlier Steely Dan tunes sound a little like they were meant for a different act. “Dirty Work” is like that.

Steely Dan Sunday: “Do It Again” from Can’t Buy a Thrill (1972)

Steely Dan Sunday: “Do It Again” from Can’t Buy a Thrill (1972)

Steely Dan explore the idea of people succumbing to their worst tendencies again and again, a theme that will get many return visits.

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