Post Tagged with: "Branford Marsalis"

Joey Calderazzo, “Mike’s Song” from Going Home (2015): One Track Mind

Joey Calderazzo, “Mike’s Song” from Going Home (2015): One Track Mind

Joey Calderazzo’s “Mike’s Song” keeps his fallen leader Michael Brecker’s spirit alive and strong with nary a single note blown from a horn.

Branford Marsalis – In My Solitude: Live at Grace Cathedral (2014)

Playing in one of this music’s holy places, Branford Marsalis gives himself, utterly, to the moment.

Eric Revis – In Memory of Things Yet Seen (2014)

The first-call acoustic bass player best known in five words or less as “Branford Marsalis’ bassist since forever” is preparing to release his own led-date In Memory of Things Yet Seen (March 25, 2014, Clean Feed Records).

Robert Hurst – BoB, A Palindrome (2013)

Around the same time Robert Hurst recorded the trio document Unrehurst, Vol. 1 with Robert Glasper (piano) and Damion Reid (drums), the bassist/composer and bandleader had convened a sort of summit meeting

Branford Marsalis Quartet – Four MFs Playin' Tunes (2012)

If you’ve often felt that saxophonist Branford Marsalis’ studio recordings failed to reflect the intensity and humor of his live appearances, this MF is for you.

New Branford Marsalis project to see vinyl-only release on Record Store Day

Saxophonist Branford Marsalis will issue his new release Four MFs Playin’ Tunes on deluxe 180-gram high definition vinyl as part of Record Store Day, April 21, 2012.

Branford Marsalis – Footsteps Of Our Fathers (2002)

by Mark Saleski You’ve gotta love what Branford Marsalis is all about. In today’s music industry, where creativity is mostly overlooked in favor of bottom-line issues, Branford made a break in advance of this album from his long-time record label

Joey Calderazzo – Amanecer (2007)

by Mark Saleski The opening track of Joey Calderazzo’s Amanecer, for once, gave the listener some insight into where the pianist was headed.

Terence Blanchard – Malcolm X: The Original Motion Picture Score (1991)

If, during the opening strains of your DVD copy of “Malcolm X,” you stop eating popcorn mid-munch, that’s just fine with trumpeter Terence Blanchard. His original score for the 1991 Spike Lee film was designed to be anything but background music.

Deep Cuts: Sting, "Island of Souls" (1991)

Deep Cuts: Sting, "Island of Souls" (1991)

“The Soul Cages,” a Sting album about boyhood grief, remains this strangely powerful if demanding narrative, one with textured song structures and densely emotional themes. Its triumph comes right away, though, on the opener “Island of Souls” — a compellingly dark, perfectly conceived tale of a riveter’s son whose dream of the open sea only grows more intense when heRead More