Post Tagged with: "Beatles For Sale"

The Beatles, “No Reply” from  Beatles for Sale (1964): Deep Beatles

The Beatles, “No Reply” from Beatles for Sale (1964): Deep Beatles

What is the link between a 1957 hit and the Beatles’ 1964 track “No Reply”? The answer lends insight into the group’s changing sound and growing lyrical sophistication.

The Beatles, “I Don’t Want to Spoil the Party” from Beatles for Sale (1964): Deep Beatles

The Beatles, “I Don’t Want to Spoil the Party” from Beatles for Sale (1964): Deep Beatles

“I Don’t Want to Spoil the Party” reveals the Beatles’ country and rockabilly roots, even as it foreshadows – like much of ‘Beatles for Sale’ – the musical changes to come.

The Beatles, “I’ll Follow the Sun” from Beatles for Sale (1964): Deep Beatles

The Beatles, “I’ll Follow the Sun” from Beatles for Sale (1964): Deep Beatles

Tellingly, Paul McCartney still occasionally performs the Beatles’ “I’ll Follow the Sun” in concert. It’s an important stepping stone in his artistic development.

The Beatles, “What You’re Doing” from Beatles for Sale (1964): Deep Beatles

The Beatles, “What You’re Doing” from Beatles for Sale (1964): Deep Beatles

Paul McCartney’s underrated “What You’re Doing” foreshadows how the Beatles would test the limits of rock later in the 1960s.

The Beatles, “Baby’s In Black” from Beatles for Sale (1964): Deep Beatles

The Beatles, “Baby’s In Black” from Beatles for Sale (1964): Deep Beatles

“Baby’s in Black” signaled the Beatles’ rapidly growing interest in musical experimentation, even as it showcased the Lennon-McCartney bond.

The Beatles, “Mr. Moonlight” from Beatles For Sale (1964): Deep Beatles

The Beatles, “Mr. Moonlight” from Beatles For Sale (1964): Deep Beatles

Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, I stand before you to defend the reputation of the Beatles’ 1964 cover of “Mr. Moonlight.”

The Beatles, “Eight Days A Week” from Beatles For Sale (1964): Deep Beatles

The Beatles, “Eight Days A Week” from Beatles For Sale (1964): Deep Beatles

The year was 1985; the scene, Mr. Tantillo’s eighth-grade chorus class. On Fridays, students were allowed to bring in their own music so we could “experience” diverse tastes.

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