Post Tagged with: "1980s"

Steely Dan Sunday, “Kulee Baba” (1980, unreleased)

Steely Dan Sunday, “Kulee Baba” (1980, unreleased)

“Kulee Baba,” when Steely Dan goes global. Ahhh, the CD. Those plastic discs of music we used before iTunes. With a noise reduction system Donald Fagen and Walter Becker were crying for when (mis)mastering Katy Lied. Seventy minutes worth and no static at all. CDs arrived commercially in the Fall of ’82, and quickly became the medium of audio-blaring choice.Read More

WTF?! Wednesdays: John Zorn, “Chronology” from Spy vs. Spy (1989)

WTF?! Wednesdays: John Zorn, “Chronology” from Spy vs. Spy (1989)

I wonder what Ornette thinks of this stuff?

(Cross the) Heartland: Pat Metheny, “Offramp” (1981)

(Cross the) Heartland: Pat Metheny, “Offramp” (1981)

Some think Metheny is joking around, that he couldn’t possibly like “all of this noise.”

(Cross the) Heartland: Pat Metheny, “Au Lait” (1981)

(Cross the) Heartland: Pat Metheny, “Au Lait” (1981)

Each song on ‘Offramp’ is so different from the next, and yet it all hangs together.

(Cross the) Heartland: Pat Metheny, “Are You Going With Me?” (1981)

(Cross the) Heartland: Pat Metheny, “Are You Going With Me?” (1981)

This song has become The Anthem at live shows.

(Cross the) Heartland: Pat Metheny, “Barcarole” (1981)

(Cross the) Heartland: Pat Metheny, “Barcarole” (1981)

I had a guitar player friend who, when the topic of Pat Metheny came up, would say that he bought a copy of Offramp when it first came out, but didn’t like it all that much because he could never figure out when Metheny was playing the guitar.

The Friday Morning Listen: Bruce Springsteen – Born In The U.S.A. (1984)

The problem with the wide range and ubiquity of our networks is that we’re aware so much of society’s goings on…maybe too much.

(Cross the) Heartland: Pat Metheny, “Estupenda Graca” (1981)

(Cross the) Heartland: Pat Metheny, “Estupenda Graca” (1981)

“Estupenda Graca” is a rare entry in the Metheny catalog in that the title, Portuguese for “Stupendous Grace,” actually matches the mood of the song.

(Cross the) Heartland: Pat Metheny, “It’s For You” (1981)

(Cross the) Heartland: Pat Metheny, “It’s For You” (1981)

While I do tend to think of music in terms of albums, there are certain songs that for a variety of reasons get pulled away from their original context.

(Cross the) Heartland: Pat Metheny, “September Fifteenth” (1981)

(Cross the) Heartland: Pat Metheny, “September Fifteenth” (1981)

In interviews, I’ve seen Lyle Mays speak of how music has it’s own “language and syntax.” He wasn’t necessarily talking about music’s technicalities — harmony, melody, and the like.