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On Second Thought: Southeast Engine – Canary (2011)

Appalachian archivists Southeast Engine are tinged with the fatalistic old-time religion of the region, most notably on 2009’s From the Forest to the Sea, so it’s tempting to see their bloodline in Old Testament terms

Quicksilver Messenger Service, with James Cotton – Live at the Old Mill Tavern (2013)

On the precipice of some very bad vibes — they were about to lose Nicky Hopkins then David Freiberg before going into a folk-rock abyss with Dino Valenti — Quicksilver Messenger Service put on one of its last truly great shows.

Steely Dan Sunday, “Cousin Dupree” (2000)

Steely Dan Sunday, “Cousin Dupree” (2000)

<<< BACKWARD (“Jack Of Speed”) ||| ONWARD (“Negative Girl”) >>> *** STEELY DAN SUNDAY INDEX *** If Two Against Nature was a somewhat unlikely winner Grammy winner for 2001, Album of the Year, the song “Cousin Dupree” was an even more unlikely winner for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals.

The Rides [Stephen Stills, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Barry Goldberg] – Can’t Get Enough (2013)

The joy surrounding this blues-rock collaboration is found not just in the Rides’ meaty originals — four of the 10 tracks are new — but in the way this just-founded trio happily attacks the cover tunes.

Mike Keneally – You Must Be This Tall (2013)

Mike Keneally – You Must Be This Tall (2013)

Perhaps the most intriguing thing about Mike Keneally, beyond his sheer talent, is that he continues to put out such consistently enjoyable music.

(Cross the) Heartland: Pat Metheny, “Icefire” (1977)

(Cross the) Heartland: Pat Metheny, “Icefire” (1977)

For me, music that tends to freeze time also tends to be sparse. “Icefire” has that, with the chiming arpeggios, artificial harmonics, and plenty of space. This track reminds me of what Pat did at the opening of “Phase Dance.”

Deep Beatles: “Because” from Abbey Road (1969)

For the next several columns, I will closely examine the legendary Abbey Road medley, their 16-minute magnum opus comprised of numerous song fragments. Where did these short works come from? How did they fit together so flawlessly?

One Track Mind: Trombone Shorty, “Fire and Brimstone” from Say That to Say This (2013)

One Track Mind: Trombone Shorty, “Fire and Brimstone” from Say That to Say This (2013)

With a groove so sharp it cuts through the night, “Fire and Brimstone” bears no small amount of resemblance to the fonky-psychedelic rock style of Trombone Shorty’s former employer, Lenny Kravitz.

Merrell Fankhauser – Rainbow Bridge Revisited (2013)

Less than two months before he left his earthly body for greener pastures on September 18, 1970, guitar god Jimi Hendrix played a free concert on the slopes of Haleakala, a volcano located in Maui, Hawaii

The Friday Morning Listen: Sleepytime Gorilla Museum – Grand Opening and Closing (2001)

It seems like everywhere I look these days, there are new articles mashing up the related themes of the demise of the record business with the (so-called) evil of the new streaming services.