Rock Music

Forgotten series: Scatterbrain – Here Comes Trouble (1990)

Forgotten series: Scatterbrain – Here Comes Trouble (1990)

What do thrash, Cheech and Chong, Mozart and some of the greatest riffs in hard rock history have in common? This sadly forgotten gem of an album.

Third Of Never – Downrising (2013)

Fans of the Grip Weeds, of which there are many, are advised to take note of this band. Not only because Kurt Reil of the Grip Weeds moonlights in Third Of Never, but they’re also great in their own right.

Paul Revere and the Raiders – Evolution To Revolution: 5 Classic Albums (2013)

Originally from the Pacific Northwest, where they deservedly earned the reputation as a hotshot band, Paul Revere and the Raiders moved to Los Angeles, California in 1964 where they scaled even greater heights.

Forgotten series: The Five Day Week Straw People – The Five Day Week Straw People (1968)

Forgotten series: The Five Day Week Straw People – The Five Day Week Straw People (1968)

A collectible psychedelic album from this one-off studio-only group consisting of UK songwriters, The Five Day Week Straw People was originally on Saga Records and features your standard British underground psychedelia

Steely Dan Sunday, “Aja [Live]” (1995)

Steely Dan Sunday, “Aja [Live]” (1995)

<<< BACKWARD (“Sign In Stranger [Live]”) ||| ONWARD (“Gaslighting Abbie”) >>> *** STEELY DAN SUNDAY INDEX *** It’s interesting to note that Alive in America ends the way the 1994 concerts actually started. The title song from the album Aja made its complete debut on Steely Dan’s second tour of the 90’s in 1994.

Forgotten series: The Black Swans – Don’t Blame the Stars (2011)

It’s a truism that our society pays homage to the sham psychotic, while sweeping the genuinely mentally ill under the rug.

Deep Beatles: “Doctor Robert” from Revolver (1966)

The Beatles recorded their share of mysterious tracks such as “I am the Walrus” or even the self-parody “Glass Onion.” Critics still analyze possible meanings of “Strawberry Fields Forever” or weird experiments like “What’s the New Mary Jane.”

Oliva – Raise the Curtain (2013)

Oliva – Raise the Curtain (2013)

If you thought Jon Oliva’s debut solo album would sound like Savatage or Jon Oliva’s Pain, you’ll be disabused of that notion right from the top. The album opens with the title track, which sounds like nothing you’ve ever heard

Gimme Five: Sammy Hagar songs with Van Halen that don’t, you know, suck

Gimme Five: Sammy Hagar songs with Van Halen that don’t, you know, suck

We’ve been excoriated by fans of Van Halen, after the band’s Sucks Series entry somehow ignored Sammy Hagar. This new list, of course, won’t help. Still, we’d like to make the argument for those times when Van Hagar was pretty good.

Across the Great Divide: The Band, “To Kingdom Come” from Music from Big Pink (1968)

After reaching across generations on the solemn and startling “Tears of Rage,” the Band leapt into a rambling groove — with Robbie Robertson taking a rare lead vocal turn for a Bob Dylan-esque exploration on the idea of salvation.