Articles by: S. Victor Aaron

Brian Blade Fellowship – Perceptual (2000)

by Pico When the phrase “jazz musician from Louisiana” is thrown out, thoughts of New Orleans immediately spring to mind. And while it’s true that NOLA is the state’s, natch, the region’s jazz hub, you can find a few from Up North over in Nick’s neck of the woods who have met success. Take, for example, Shreveport native Brian Blade.Read More

One Track Mind: Henry Threadgill, "I Can’t Wait To Get Home" (1987)

This week’s single song review shines a light on avant-jazz composer/flautist/altoist Henry Threadgill. A part of the seventies whack jazz movement that brought us such lunimaries as Julius Hemphill, David Murray and the Art Ensemble of Chicaco, Threadgill was one third of the modern creative ensemble Air with bassist Fred Hopkins and percussionist Steve McCall until they called it quitsRead More

Charlie Hunter – Charlie Hunter (2000)

by Pico From Stanton Moore we make a short hop to his Garage A Trois bandmate Charlie Hunter. Even among eccentric acid-jazz musicians, Hunter stands out. First of all, for all the soul-jazz, funk and world fusion he paints on his canvas, he is a bop man at heart; most of his records will even feature a Mingus or Monk-typeRead More

Stanton Moore – Flyin' The Koop (2002)

by S. Victor Aaron To kick off the Acid (jazz) Redux series, I’m gonna cheat and start with an album review I already wrote back in September of 2002. But since the artist in question is a good ol’ boy from Louisiana and the album in question is so danged bitchin’, I couldn’t think of a better way to startRead More

George Benson – The Other Side Of Abbey Road (1969)

by S. Victor Aaron I was trying to get mentally prepared to actually describe a Charlie Hunter record when on a whim I decided to cue up GB’s The Other Side Of Abbey Road. That got me to thinking about Nick’s piece on the best Beatle remakes (hey Nick, I forgot one: Stevie Wonder’s sizzling 1970 version of “We CanRead More

Forgotten series: The Sensational Guitars of Dan & Dale, "Batman & Robin" (1966)

by S. Victor Aaron So you’re looking at the album cover just to the left and guessing that it’s a vintage children’s record intended to cash in on the hit mid-sixties series starring Adam West and you would be right. But there was no such band as “The Sensational Guitars of Dan and Dale”.

Deep Cuts: The Rolling Stones, "Can't You Hear Me Knocking" (1970)

by S. Victor Aaron The critics all declare Exile On Main Street to be The Rolling Stones’ magnum opus. Yeah, it’s a great album alright but for my money, I’ll take the one right before it, Sticky Fingers, anyday. From the sass of “Brown Sugar” to the gentle country of “Wild Horses” the record is mostly a merry celebration ofRead More

Otis Taylor – Below The Fold (2005)

by S. Victor Aaron Most bluesmen sing the blues with sadness, resignation or even celebration. Not Otis Taylor. He’s got the blues and he’s pissed about it.

Miles Davis – The Complete ‘In A Silent Way’ Sessions (1968-69)

Miles Davis – The Complete ‘In A Silent Way’ Sessions (1968-69)

‘In a Silent Way’ is the demarcation line between Miles Davis’ acoustic, straight-jazz era and the electric jazz-rock fusion sound to come.

Pharoah Sanders – Journey To The One (1980)

By S. Victor Aaron When Nick’s article on that badass Idris Muhammed started name-checking all the jazz heavyweights that this great dummer had been associated with, I then realized how many records with his imprint that are among some of my all time favorites. It would easy to launch into a gush-fest over John Scofield’s Groove Elation, but Sco’ hasRead More

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