Articles by: S. Victor Aaron

Gimme Five: Funky records from Herbie Hancock, Jeff Lorber, Grover Washington Jr., The Crusaders, David Sanborn

This time we look at albums with grooves in the pocket even if they weren’t much in the press: 1) Herbie Hancock, Mr. Hands (1980)The seventies began very creatively for HH, first with the space funk Mwandishi albums followed by the better-known Head Hunters period that firmly eastablished Herbie’s pre-eminance in synthesized instrumental funk. But as the decade wore on,Read More

Something Else! sneak peek: Miles Davis – The Complete 'In a Silent Way' Sessions (2001)

by S. Victor Aaron On the Columbia re-release of Miles Davis’ “The Complete In a Silent Way Sessions” … This 3 cd set covers Miles Davis’ recoding sessions from September, 1968 to February, 1969, chronicalling the line of demarcation between “acoustic Miles” and “electric Miles”. It is an important piece of work for historical reasons, making the listener a flyRead More

Steely Dan – Two Against Nature (2000)

Steely Dan – Two Against Nature (2000)

Twenty years is a long time to go without a proper studio album, but long-suffering fans of Steely Dan finally got relief in February of 2000.

Something Else! Featured Artist: Steely Dan

by S. Victor Aaron 1) Aja (1977)Strong set of songs + note perfect production + top notch musicianship = masterpiece. High point: The Wayne Shorter and Steve Gadd exchange during the extended instrumental passage of the title cut. Low point: Didn’t come with a second LP.

Something Else! Featured Artist: Jean Luc Ponty

by S. Victor Aaron LIFE ENIGMA (2001): Born in Avranches, France, in 1942, classically-trained violinist Jean Luc Ponty discovered Miles and ‘Trane in his twenties and became a pioneer in the fusion movement of the late-sixties and throughout the seventies. He was — and still is — arguably the finest electric violinist in the world. Oops, did I say “arguably”?Read More

Gimme Five: Overlooked Miles Davis recordings

Another in a series of overlooked jazz classics. This time we look at diamonds in the rough by perhaps the single most influential figure in jazz since World War II: Miles Davis. A high profile artist whose work has been picked apart as much as Davis’ won’t have a lot of unturned stones despite some 45+ years of recording history.Read More

Miles Davis – Tutu (1986)

by S. Victor Aaron Recently I revisited an album that wore our my cassette player during late ’86-early ’87: Tutu by Miles Davis. It typically takes a long time to get the right perspective on a Miles record, he was often took a direction in music before his listeners were ready to follow him down the path he was taking.Read More