Articles by: Kasper Nijsen

Forgotten series: Bob Carpenter – Silent Passage (1984)

In the melancholy wisdom of his lyrics, this lost singer-songwriter has very few rivals.

Jesse Winchester (1944-2014): An Appreciation

Jesse Winchester (1944-2014): An Appreciation

So, have all your passionate violins play a tune for a Tennessee kid …

Built to Spill, Glen Hansard, Carl Broemel – Bob Dylan in the 80s: Volume One (2014)

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times. It was the age of waning religious zeal and disco experimentation, the epoch of brilliant outtakes like “Blind Willie McTell” and lackluster releases like Down in the Groove.

Forgotten series: Judee Sill – Heart Food (1973)

Though the late Warren Zevon didn’t record a whole lot of covers, when he did they always revealed his excellent taste: from Prince’s “Raspberry Beret” to Steve Winwood’s “Back in the High Life Again” and Bob Dylan’s “Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door.”

Jackson C. Frank – Jackson C. Frank (1965; 2014 reissue)

Whatever god dreamed up Jackson C. Frank’s fate must have been in a pretty morbid mood.

Sammy Walker – Sammy Walker; Blue Ridge Mountain Skyline (2014)

Sammy Walker – Sammy Walker; Blue Ridge Mountain Skyline (2014)

“The jukebox in the café don’t play nothing that I know: Hell, I guess I’ll save my quarter to hear that steam-boat whistle blow”: Sammy Walker’s voice still sounds strong on Blue Ridge Mountain Skyline.

Something Else! Interview: Singer-songwriter Sammy Walker

Something Else! Interview: Singer-songwriter Sammy Walker

Some careers follow a beaten path to fame and fortune, but for others the road is rough and rocky, winding its way past brief success and disappointment. This has certainly been the case for Sammy Walker

David Ackles – David Ackles (1968; 2013 reissue)

As the world is gearing up for the annual shopping and eating spree that we call Christmas, a remarkable album is set to be reissued: the moody debut of David Ackles, first issued by Elektra Records in 1968.

Remembering JFK: Phil Ochs, “That Was The President” and “Crucifixion” (1965, ’67)

Remembering JFK: Phil Ochs, “That Was The President” and “Crucifixion” (1965, ’67)

It was the first time his wife saw him cry. When Phil Ochs heard the news of John F. Kennedy’s assassination, he was inconsolable: “I think I’m going to die tonight, Alice,” he told his wife. “I’m going to die.”

Warren Zevon’s Forgotten Gems: Gimme Five

Warren Zevon’s Forgotten Gems: Gimme Five

It would be an injustice if we remember Warren Zevon merely for his 1978 novelty hit single “Werewolves of London.”