Articles by: Kasper Nijsen

Mickey Newbury, “The Long Road Home” (2002): One Track Mind

Mickey Newbury, “The Long Road Home” (2002): One Track Mind

An ailing Mickey Newbury saved one of his best songs for the final album released during his lifetime.

Phil Ochs (1940-1976): An Appreciation

Phil Ochs (1940-1976): An Appreciation

For a while, Phil Ochs’ vision of America fuelled the shared dreams of the 1960s. He would have turned 74 today.

Joaquin Sabina, “Y Sin Embargo” from Yo, Mi, Me, Contigo (1996): One Track Mind

This is the perfect introduction to Joaquin Sabina’s music: a subversive love ballad that’s at once tender and cruelly unforgiving.

Graham Nash, “Simple Man” (1971): Forgotten Series

Graham Nash, “Simple Man” (1971): Forgotten Series

Graham Nash doesn’t dilute “Simple Man” with wish-fulfillment fantasies. There’s just this: a heart that longs for what’s been lost.

Nick Drake, “Day is Done” (1969): One Track Mind

Nick Drake, “Day is Done” (1969): One Track Mind

One of Nick Drake’s most haunting songs, “Day is Done” is blessedly free of the overdone production that marred many of his early recordings.

Bob Dylan, “Tangled Up in Blue” (1975): One Track Mind

Bob Dylan, “Tangled Up in Blue” (1975): One Track Mind

This song is for Bob Dylan’s Seventies what “Like a Rolling Stone” was for his Sixties: a farewell.

On Second Thought: David Ackles, “Montana Song” from American Gothic (1972)

On Second Thought: David Ackles, “Montana Song” from American Gothic (1972)

Bombastic and wildly ambitious, but also deeply moving.

Gimme Five: Songs of despair by Townes Van Zandt, Nick Drake, Phil Ochs, others

Gimme Five: Songs of despair by Townes Van Zandt, Nick Drake, Phil Ochs, others

A visit with singers who know what it means to lose heart.

Phil Ochs – Live Again (2014)

Phil Ochs – Live Again (2014)

We find Phil Ochs sharpening his weapons for a final attack on injustice.

Forgotten series: Val Stöecklein – Grey Life (1969)

Forgotten series: Val Stöecklein – Grey Life (1969)

Not long after leaving the Blue Things, Stöecklein laid bare his deepest yearnings and despair.

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