Articles by: David Greenberg

Kenny Garrett, jazz saxophonist: Something Else! Interview

Kenny Garrett, jazz saxophonist: Something Else! Interview

Kenny Garrett on carrying the spirit of John Coltrane, and taking his audience on a journey.

Abe Ovadia – Three by Three (2014)

Nearly a year ago, I wrote a review about a stellar performance by Abe Ovadia — a young up and coming guitarist who creates his own rules and is an imitation of no one.

Shows I’ll Never Forget: Kenny Garrett Quintet, October 11, 2013

At Ronnie Scott’s in London: Perhaps for Kenny Garrett and his quintet, it was just another night … just another gig. But for me, and I suspect for others in the audience at Ronnie Scott’s that night, it wasn’t.

Ode to Omni – October’s Fire (2013)

The Philadelphia music scene has long been known for its vibrancy, eclecticism, and musical edge. Nearly two years ago, drummer and Philly native Marcus Myers suffered an accident that forced him to take a break from playing

JD Allen, Exploring the Symbolism in Grace: Something Else! Interview

JD Allen, Exploring the Symbolism in Grace: Something Else! Interview

In this final segment of a three-part Something Else! Sitdown with JD Allen, David Greenberg explores the saxophonist’s terrific new release, the dying concept of expressing emotion in song, and Allen’s need to keep progressing

JD Allen, Fightin’ to the Edge of the Grave: Something Else! Interview

We continue today with the second installment of David Greenberg’s three-part talk with JD Allen, as the saxophonist discusses developing confidence as a young player, participating in the good fight, and how music influences us

JD Allen, Preaching the Word through Music: Something Else! Interview

JD Allen is emerging as one of the most innovative saxophonists of our time. His music, through a masterful use of melody reveals a personal story and an inner quest.

On the Abe Ovadia Trio, and the never-ending search for John Coltrane’s fiery intensity

Whenever I go to a live music event my hope is to get completely absorbed and immersed within the music. I find that the musicians who do this most for me are not the ones who show off their mastery of the language or technical proficiency.

You’re doing it wrong: Why do so many jazz educators teach us to think first — and listen second?

You’re doing it wrong: Why do so many jazz educators teach us to think first — and listen second?

It’s why many musicians today lack their own unique and innovative sound.

Singin' (and dancin') in the rain: Hope for my generation at the Traction Music Festival

Where this past weekend would you find live music that spanned the styles of jazz, rock, funk, R&B, soul, reggae, and electronic; to see an audience of people young and old, of any and all nationalities, so deeply into the music