The Apples in Stereo – The Discovery of a World Inside the Moone (2000): Forgotten Series

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Originally called the Apples, the Apples in Stereo were one of the brightest lights beaming forth from the fertile indie community of the naughties – and they’re still active today. By gorging on the gospels of the Beach Boys, the Beatles and the Byrds, then sliding their own concepts into the sermons, the band creates songs that are a natural extension of their influences.

The progression continued on The Discovery of a World Inside the Moone, the Apples in Stereo’s third full-length album, but in a tighter manner. Although the quirky angles remain intact, the melodies and arrangements are more focused, allowing radio-friendly pop sensibilities to merge seamlessly with experimental escapades.

Riddled with bellowing brass, “Go” bounds along at a vigorous pace and is spiked with a short and snappy jazz flavored jam, and “The Bird That You Can’t See” mixes funk grooves with power pop traction to appealing effects. Chains of crunchy guitar chords producing an almost glam-like luster manifest on “The Rainbow,” and “20 Suggestive Cases of…” reels and romps with enthusiasm.

Volume and velocity, rife with juicy hooks and punchy instrumental moves, are further exercised on “I Can’t Believe” and “Stream Running Over,” while “Submarine Dream” and “Stay Gold” propose a softer and quieter delivery.

Sweet and sparkly vocals, supported by swarms of sunny harmonies, make Apples in Stereo songs easy to love. A merry mood directs The Discovery of a World Inside the Moone, which is subsequently splashed with psychedelic and bubblegum aspirations. Spacy interludes lounge eye to eye with the clapping of hands and jaunty keyboards, prompting the songs to spawn enough interesting twists and turns to keep the listener satisfied.

Alive with energy and passion, The Discovery of a World Inside the Moone (spinART records) represents everything the Apples in Stereo stand for. Doling out tuneful and clever songs, the band are first-rate sonic explorers fully committed to their craft.

Beverly Paterson

Beverly Paterson

Beverly Paterson was born the day Ben E. King hit No. 4 with "Stand By Me" -- which is actually one of her favorite songs, especially John Lennon's version. She's contributed to Lance Monthly and Amplifier, and served as Rock Beat International's associate editor. Paterson has also published Inside Out, and Twist & Shake. Contact Something Else! at reviews@somethingelsereviews.com.
Beverly Paterson
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