Caddy – The Better End (2015)

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A one-man band, Tomas Dahl is the engineer behind Caddy. He released two albums under this moniker prior to The Better End which I haven’t heard — and that can be a good thing since no preconceived notions are to be had. But I must say The Better End (Kool Kat Musik) turned me into an instant convert, and is bound to the have the same effect on those with an unquenchable thirst for jangly pop rock.

Although it’s not hard to decipher Caddy’s mentors, as they ring loud and clear throughout the album, Tomas lobs enough of his own imaginative angles and curves into his songs to save them from landing in the derivative pile. Resourceful arrangements collide in unity with smartly shifting tempos and becoming hooks and breaks, tipping towards tunes beaming with a fresh-faced spiritedness.

The soul of Teenage Fan Club presides over cuts such as the chiming crunch of “Something About Carina” and the sweet and sleepy “Here It Comes Again,” where the big and bouncy beat of “Into The Sun” gives thanks to both Dwight Twilley and Tom Petty. Racing forth with galloping rhythms, handclaps and the captivating blow of a saxophone, “Wherever You Go” is a through and through pop classic, as is the tirelessly melodic “Bring It Back,” while the title track of the album, which is highlighted by a bliss-baked swirl of Beach Boys-styled harmonies, is mellow and breath-taking.

Rocking with intent to a gripping glam-laced shoegazing slant aimed to excite fans of the Wondermints and Ride, “No Sudden Moves” proves to be another victory, as well as the clanging power chording of “Chasing Clouds” and “Beautiful Strange” that pinches a page in the book from the foot-tapping folk pop of Simon and Garfunkel before switching channels and laying down a shot of shaking feedback.

Ignited by a happy and relaxed mood, Caddy’s The Better End promises pleasures galore. Music is meant to make the listener feel alive, and here’s an album targeted to do so. May Caddy forever serenade us with cool and catchy songs!

Beverly Paterson

Beverly Paterson

Beverly Paterson was born the day Ben E. King hit No. 4 with "Stand By Me" -- which is actually one of her favorite songs, especially John Lennon's version. She's contributed to Lance Monthly and Amplifier, and served as Rock Beat International's associate editor. Paterson has also published Inside Out, and Twist & Shake. Contact Something Else! at reviews@somethingelsereviews.com.
Beverly Paterson
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