The Mills Brothers, “Cab Driver” (1968): Forgotten series

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By the time the Age of Aquarius arrived, artists from the big band era were disappearing deeper and deeper in the portals of the past. So what a surprise it was for the Mills Brothers to suddenly find themselves back on the airwaves.

Formed 1928 in Piqua, Ohio, the Mills Brothers ruled the scene from the 1930s through the 1950s, reaping phenomenal success with evergreen songs like “Paper Doll,” “I’ll Be Around,” “You Always Hurt The One You Love,” “Till Then,” “I’ve Got My Love To Keep Me Warm,” “Lazy River,” and “The Glow Worm.” Accurately coined the Kings Of Harmony, not only could they sing in heavenly unison, but they also cut a striking presence and were a huge influence on the doo-wop outfits of the pre-rock and roll years.

Fast forward to 1968. A foot-tapping shuffle, accompanied by blasts of twangy guitars and catchy vocals piloted “Cab Driver” (Dot Records) to the No. 23 spot on the national charts. By marrying jazzy dance hall overtones to a contemporary beat, the Mills Brothers scored yet another home run.

Composed by C. Carson Parks (author of “Something Stupid,” a massive hit for Frank and Nancy Sinatra in 1967), “Cab Driver” would be the group’s final hit single. But they carried on for decades, and the name is currently being kept alive by a new generation of kin.

Beverly Paterson

Beverly Paterson

Beverly Paterson was born the day Ben E. King hit No. 4 with "Stand By Me" -- which is actually one of her favorite songs, especially John Lennon's version. She's contributed to Lance Monthly and Amplifier, and served as Rock Beat International's associate editor. Paterson has also published Inside Out, and Twist & Shake. Contact Something Else! at reviews@somethingelsereviews.com.
Beverly Paterson
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