The Foundations – Baby Now That I’ve Found You (1967): On Second Thought

Share this:

Although herds of artists have emulated the mighty sound of Motown, the Foundations were one of the finest acts to obtain such a feat.

Formed 1967 in England, the group not only stood out because they had the goods, but their demographics were wide and diverse. The youngest member in the Foundations was 18, with the eldest pushing 40. As well, they came from different corners of the world, ranging from Trinidad to Jamacia to Ceylon to the Dominican Republic.

The band’s debut American album, Baby Now That I’ve Found You (Uni Records) featured their first big hit single of the same name, which raced to the No. 11 spot on the national charts early in 1968. Huge and healthy harmonies fashioned after the Four Tops, compounded by tight and precise instrumentation and a sweet and sunny exterior that belies the mournful musings of a rejected suitor, are the intoxicating chemicals enclosed within the song.

Other potent entries included on “Baby Now That I’ve Found You” are “Love Is A Five Letter Word,” “Just A Little While Longer,” “I’ve Seen The Writing On The Wall,” a cover of Joe Tex’s funky “Show Me,” and the breezy head-swaying “I Can Take Or Leave Your Loving,” which was a minor hit for Herman’s Hermits.

Possessing no heavy messages or trendy experimentation, Baby Now That I’ve Found You is simply a streamlined soul pop affair. Slick but not clinical, the songs are attentively played and produced. Gospel styled choruses, hooky chords, splashes of brass orchestration, and an authentic feel and commitment to the music the Foundations performed are the focus.

In late 1968, the Foundations struck it rich again, this time with “Build Me Up Buttercup,” which reached a lofty No. 3 on the airwaves and was basically a relatively remodeled version of “Baby Now That I’ve Found You.” The band’s moment in the spotlight may have been rather brief on these shores, but they achieved much more success in other parts of the world, particularly the United Kingdom and Canada.

Beverly Paterson

Beverly Paterson

Beverly Paterson was born the day Ben E. King hit No. 4 with "Stand By Me" -- which is actually one of her favorite songs, especially John Lennon's version. She's contributed to Lance Monthly and Amplifier, and served as Rock Beat International's associate editor. Paterson has also published Inside Out, and Twist & Shake. Contact Something Else! at reviews@somethingelsereviews.com.
Beverly Paterson
Share this:
Close