Archive for September 15th, 2013

Tony Joe White – Hoodoo (2013)

Tony Joe White – Hoodoo (2013)

Tony Joe White boasts a uniformly comfortable approach, established with 1968’s “Poke Salad Annie” and repeated since with all the regularity of shotgun rows of Southern-grown cash crops.

‘He’s really proud of what we’ve done’: An update on Earth Wind and Fire’s ailing Maurice White

‘He’s really proud of what we’ve done’: An update on Earth Wind and Fire’s ailing Maurice White

As Earth Wind and Fire nears the two-decade mark without Maurice White as an every-day presence, it’s issued a return-to-form new disc — though their thoughts remain with the group’s founder.

Carcass – Surgical Steel (2013)

Surgical Steel, the first record since 1996 from reunited English death metal legends Carcass, is probably one of the most anticipated of the year for many metal fans. I can’t really say that I was among them.

Steely Dan Sunday, “The Last Mall” (2003)

Steely Dan Sunday, “The Last Mall” (2003)

<<< BACKWARD (“West Of Hollywood”) ||| ONWARD (“Things I Miss The Most”) >>> *** STEELY DAN SUNDAY INDEX *** The re-kindling of one of rock’s greatest songwriting partnerships bore fruit with Two Against Nature in 2000 and by sheer inertia, brought forth a follow-up with Everything Must Go

Pete Anderson – Birds Above Guitarland (2013)

Best known for his genre-shifting early collaborations with Dwight Yoakam, Pete Anderson has spent the last decade focusing on a solo career — and, with Birds Above Guitarland, the blues.

‘People need a villain and he got chosen’: David Marks staunchly defends the Beach Boys’ Mike Love

‘People need a villain and he got chosen’: David Marks staunchly defends the Beach Boys’ Mike Love

David Marks found himself on the outside looking in when Mike Love continued with a scaled-down version of the Beach Boys after their 50th anniversary tour.

Tommy Keene – Excitement at Your Feet (2013)

When Tommy Keene decided to make good on the promise of covers like Alex Chilton’s “Hey Little Child” or (more recently) Slim Dunlap’s “Nowheres Near,” he explore deeply into what must be an expansive record collection.