New Music Monday: Booker T, Mavis Staples, Dio, Jethro Tull, Queensryche, Yellowjackets

Cool items from Booker T (of MGs’ fame), Mavis Staples, Queensryche (the one without Geoff Tate) and the Yellowjackets, a massive concert set from Jethro Tull and a bevy of reissue projects jump start this New Music Monday.

We’ll dig into an expanded look at a key moment in the Allman Brothers Band’s history, and the the 1990s-era work of Steve Earle. There is also a new examination of perhaps Ronnie James Dio’s last major work.

Stick around for new indie music from Willie Nile, new prog from Wrong Object, new R&B-soaked rock from Bobby Whitlock, new jazz from Brian Landrus and Robert Walter, new metal from Anon Amarth and White Wizzard, and new blues from Watermelon Slim.

That about covers the musical waterfront, right?

Alicia KeysVH1 Storytellers (R&B)

ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND – BROTHERS AND SISTERS: 40TH ANNIVERSARY SUPER DELUXE EDITION (POP/ROCK): Chronicling, and expanding upon, the initial album of their post-Duane Allman era, this new reissue gives us a definitive early glimpse into how the endlessly adaptable Allman Brothers Band would continue forward — through that initial creative cataclysm and, in a broader sense, on into today. Brothers and Sisters, it turns out, would be the first, but nowhere near the last, time the group was completely reborn. (More here.) — Nick DeRiso

AMON AMARTH – DECEIVER OF THE GODS (ROCK/METAL): A loose concept album about Loki from metal’s premier set of Vikings? Yes, please. It’s heavy, it’s brutal, but it also grooves. Amon Amarth at their best. — Fred Phillips

Annie KozuchMostly Jobim (Vocals)
Benny GoodmanComplete Legendary Carnegie Hall 1938 Concert (Jazz)
Big StarNothing Can Hurt Me (Pop/Rock)

BOBBY WHITLOCK AND COCO CARMEL – CARNIVAL (POP/ROCK): Carnival, a live date in their hometown of Austin, is flecked with classics from Whitlock’s tenure in Derek and the Dominos like “Tell the Truth,” “Why Does Love Got To Be So Sad,” “Got to Get Better” and “Keep On Growing.” Whitlock, who co-founded the Dominos with Eric Clapton, also contributes originals like “It’s Not the End of the World,” which are paired with Whitlock/Carmel collaborations including “John the Revelator” as well as Carmel’s “Nobody Knows,” a key moment from their most recent album, 2012’s Esoteric. (More here.) — Nick DeRiso

Bob MarleyLegend: Remixed (Reggae)

[amazon_enhanced asin=”B00CHRB9RM” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B00CEJ2H6K” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B00CA4S3SU” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B00D01CXRE” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B00CVB6SV6″ container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /]

BOOKER T. – SOUND THE ALARM (R&B): Songs like the advance track “Father Son Blues” herald a return to grittier, more elemental sounds — the warm, generation-defining sounds, in fact, of his old Stax house band Booker T. and the MGS — after Jones’ experiments in fusion and hip hop on the guest-packed, Grammy-winning Road to Memphis. And they’re just as personal as can be: Booker T. composed or collaborated on each of the 12 song featured here. (More here.) — Nick DeRiso

Bret MichaelsJammin’ With Friends (Pop/Rock)

BRIAN LANDRUS – KALEIDOSCOPE MIRAGE (JAZZ): This low reed ace is making a huge impression in a small amount of time. Still only four years removed from his de facto introduction as a leader, each of the three albums he’s made since then (all released in 2011) were meaningful steps forward, and so is this fourth one. For this album, Landrus carries forward his vision of electro/acoustic ideas introduced on Capsule and not insignificantly, adds a small string section to the mix. (More here.) — S. Victor Aaron

Dean MartinItalian Love Songs (Vocals)

[amazon_enhanced asin=”B00CC7RE0I” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B009W6OWO8″ container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B00D06XRO2″ container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B00CL1C6NK” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B00CI5MYEK” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /]

DIO – MAGICA DELUXE EDITION (ROCK/METAL): Dio’s most underrated album, a late-career masterpiece, gets the re-release treatment in a two-disc set with some bonus goodies for fans. (More here.) — Fred Phillips

George Jones, Merle Haggard and Johnny Paycheck - Double Trouble; Taste of Yesterday’s Wine (Country)
Hank WilliamsSacred Songs II: The Unreleased Recordings (Country)
India ArieSongversation (R&B)
James BrownBest of Live at the Apollo: 50th Anniversary (R&B)
Jane’s AddictionLive in NYC (Pop/Rock)
Jeff BeckFrankie’s House (Pop/Rock)
Jerry Band GarciaVol. 2-Garcialive: August 5th 1990 (Pop/Rock)

JETHRO TULL – AROUND THE WORLD LIVE (PROG/ROCK): This new four-DVD set chronicles performances between 1970’s Isle of Wight Festival and 2005’s Estival at Lugano Switzerland, and also includes photos from frontman Ian Anderson’s personal collection, an expanded interview with Anderson from 1999, and new liner notes from Joel McIver, too. (More here.) — Nick DeRiso

Jimmy CliffThe KCRW Session (Reggae)
Johnny ThundersHurt Me (Pop/Rock)

[amazon_enhanced asin=”B00C99WXWS” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B00CVB6THE” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B00CFYD5YM” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B00CCEHR80″ container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B00CDV4Q54″ container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /]

Julia FordhamPorcelain (Pop/Rock)
Kikoski, Carpenter, Novak and SheppardFrom the Hip (Jazz)
Louis ArmstrongComplete Satch Plays Fats (Jazz)
Lurrie BellBlues In My Soul (Blues)
Mannheim SteamrollerThe Music of the Spheres (Classical/Pop)

MAVIS STAPLES – ONE TRUE VINE (R&B): For Staples, this is a happy reunion with Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy, who also produced her terrific 2010 release You Are Not Alone. Tweedy, along with son Spencer, also play nearly all of the instruments on this new studio effort. Recorded at Wilco’s Loft, the album includes Funkadelic’s “Can You Get To That,” as well as a pair of tunes written specifically for her by Tweedy (“Jesus Wept”) and by Nick Lowe (“Celestial Shore”), as well as a cover of Low’s “Holy Ghost” — another Tweedy production from the Loft that later appeared on The Invisible Way. (More here.) — Nick DeRiso

Nancy WilsonI Know I Love Him; Kaleidoscope (Jazz)
Paul YoungRemixes and Rarities (Pop/Rock)
Peabo Bryson and Roberta FlackBorn to Love (R&B)

[amazon_enhanced asin=”B00DC9SA94″ container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B00C9PQ7I8″ container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B00CSQMB7Y” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B00CI5MYWW” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B00AK77WYA” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /]

QUEENSRYCHE – QUEENSRYCHE (ROCK/METAL): I expected this album to be better than the Geoff Tate version, but I didn’t expect to like it as much as I do. Each trip through I’ve liked it a little better, and there are a few really outstanding songs. So much for Tate’s remarks about the other guys in the band not being able to write songs. (More here.) — Fred Phillips

Ray VaughnWay Down Low (Pop/Rock)

ROBERT WALTER’S 20TH CONGRESS – GET THY BEARINGS (JAZZ): As one of acid jazz’s star keyboard performers, Walter is all about applying the B3 magic of Robert “Groove” Holmes and Big John Patton to the groovalicious sounds found in funk, rock and fusion around the turn of the 70s. That’s undeniably his mission again for Bearings. Acid jazz records are meant to be party records, but as far as a jazzy party record goes, Get Thy Bearings is a pretty mature effort. Groove vamps are paramount but Robert Walter knows what chord changes are, too, and never runs an idea into the ground. (More here.) — S. Victor Aaron

Roscoe MitchellLive At ‘A Space’ 1975 (Jazz)
Stan Getz and Charlie ByrdJazz Samba (Jazz)

STEVE EARLE – THE WARNER BROS. YEARS (COUNTRY/ROCK): This set represents an often-overlooked period, and one of intense experimentation, for Steve Earle — who couldn’t have been further removed (personally or professionally) from his earliest triumphs on Guitar Town and Copperhead Road. In the meantime, Earle had run afoul with the law, amidst a whirling descent into drug abuse. Cleaned up at the end of 1994, he began his career anew — in more ways than one. Being sober had led Earle to a new focus on trying new sounds, on trying new things. (More here.) — Nick DeRiso

[amazon_enhanced asin=”B00CM9JKQM” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B00CS9NIS2″ container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B00C7RVN6Y” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B0000047CW” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B00CHR7FIO” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /]

SylvesterMighty Real: Greatest Dance Hits (R&B)
The Blow MonkeysHalfway to Heaven: Best of (Pop/Rock)
The Teardrop ExplodesWilder (Pop/Rock)
The Moody BluesTimeless Flight (Prog/Rock)

THE WRONG OBJECT – AFTER THE EXHIBITION (PROG/ROCK): After five years, the Wrong Object returns with an expanded lineup — and a radically expanded sound palette, with bold electronic textures from new keyboardist Antoine Guenet and stunning harmonic complexities from a pair of saxists in Francois Lourtie and Marti Melia. The results mix angular Zappa-esque intellect and furious invention. (More here.) — Nick DeRiso

Various artistsBluesin’ on the Bayou [Slim Harpo; Lightnin’ Slim; Boozoo Chavis; Left Hand Charlie, others] (Blues)

WATERMELON SLIM AND THE WORKERS – BULL GOOSE ROOSTER (BLUES): Along with Otis Taylor, Watermelon Slim is also one of the few bluesmen working today who regularly takes on political issues, but whereby Taylor directs his ire and concerns toward broad societal issues, Slim directs his aim at the ruling class. His songs “A Wrench In The Machine” and “The Foreign Policy Blues” carry on the fight he’s been bringing to the establishment since 1973’s Merry Airbrakes and as a self-described, self-styled whistle-blower, even dedicates the album to America’s whistle-blowers past and present. (More here.) — Nick DeRiso

[amazon_enhanced asin=”B000050XIO” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B00BMUL52Y” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B00CA4S24K” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B00CJXYQJM” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B00CJ7Y09Y” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /]

WHITE WIZZARD – THE DEVIL’S CUT (ROCK/METAL): I continue to be torn by this band. Their full-length debut, Over the Top, was my favorite record of 2010, but they just can’t seem to hit that stride again. The Devil’s Cut is better than 2011’s Flying Tigers, but it’s still lacking the hooks, riffs and just campy fun of Over the Top. — Fred Phillips

WILLIE NILE – AMERICAN RIDE (POP/ROCK): American Ride — part singer-songwriter (“Life on Bleeker Street”), part flinty rocker (“Say Hey”): it’s like Dylan sitting in with the Replacements — might finally be the album that breaks this underground sensation. Besides solidifying everything that had only been hinted at with the fine notices for 2011’s The Innocent Ones,, it works as a kind of codification for Nile’s lasting rebel cool. (More here.) — Nick DeRiso

Wishbone AshLive Dates (Prog/Rock)

YELLOWJACKETS – A RISE IN THE ROAD (JAZZ): Their second album for Mack Avenue will be their first with the new bassist — and the Yellowjackets went big, calling in a Pastorius. As in, Felix Pastorius, the son of you-know-who. A Rise In The Road comes just two years after Timeline, suggesting a not only a willingness but outright anxiousness to carry on and meet the challenge head-on. They go about that in a very businesslike manner, making the vintage Mintzer-era Yellowjackets album, effortlessly straddling the line between contemporary jazz and straight ahead jazz. (More here.) — S. Victor Aaron

YesGoing for the One (Prog/Rock)

[amazon_enhanced asin=”B00CMYRTEC” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B00COQU00I” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B000024JCA” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B00CAZOHQG” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B0012QK7S6″ container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /]

Something Else!

The Something Else! webzine, an accredited Google News affiliate, has been featured in The New York Times and NPR.com's A Blog Supreme, while our writers have also been published by USA Today, Jazz.com and UltimateClassicRock.com, among others. Contact Something Else! at reviews@somethingelsereviews.com.