The Lowbots – The Lowbots (2010)

Musical fashions and fads may come and go, but in the end a band will always be judged solely by their songs. As long as the tunes are catchy and memorable, that is what is important. Having stated that, the Lowbots are not only relevant now, but decades on they will still be moving listeners with their well written and enthusiastically executed sentiments.

Getting it right the first time around, the North Carolina band strike an impressive pose here on their debut album. Comprised of a dozen garage pop pleasers that sit knee to knee with the best of the genre, The Lowbots (lowtunes music) offers the kind of organic textures that refuses to date. Honest and simple, but bursting with energy and playfulness, the disc deposits silver tokens at every turn.

Putting the power into pop, spunky tracks such as “Like A Dream,” “Beware” and “Puffin” pay loving lip service to the Smithereens, as they tingle and crunch with life and luster. The band remains constantly in control of the environment, while they toss off zesty hooks with ease. The vocals, which are clear and cozy, seem to float on air, bringing to mind an intriguing blend of Alex Chilton, Lou Reed and Neil Young.

Scripted of witty commentary on cyberspace, the jerky, jittery rhythm reflexes of “Virtual-Made Man” is the sort of tune one can imagine Ray Davies of the Kinks penning, “A Million Ways” shivers with trippy “Revolver” influenced psychedelic doo-dads, and “Norlina” is a groovy instrumental, complete with a thumping, pumping organ, that reels and rolls to a soul styled mod beat ala the Small Faces.

The Lowbots were formed in 2008 by lead singer and guitarist Tony Low, who attracted a lot of attention in the ’80s with the Cheepskates, a New York band that laid down some of the coolest garage-pop nuggets conceivable. He has also staged a magnitude of a mark with his solo work, and his latest venture, “Tone-Wah,” which has just been released, continues his tradition of excellence.

Drummer Mike Glock and bassist and vocalist Peter Tyler are the other talented members of the Lowbots. So take a bow, fellows, and then return for an encore!

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Beverly Paterson

Beverly Paterson was born the day Ben E. King hit No. 4 on the national charts with "Stand By Me" - which is ironically one of her favorite songs, especially the version by John Lennon. She has also contributed to Lance Monthly and Amplifier, and served as associate editor of Rock Beat International. Paterson's own publications have included Inside Out, and Twist And Shake. Contact Something Else! at reviews@somethingelsereviews.com.

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