‘It’s has to be said’: Mick Jagger admits that Rolling Stones fans don’t want to hear the new stuff

In a move that is perhaps only surprising to Mick Jagger, fans have been cool to the Rolling Stones’ newest songs — even while reacting with overt enthusiasm to their older music — as the band celebrates its 50th anniversary.

The Stones, of course, issued a pair of original songs, “Doom and Gloom” and “Another Shot,” in advance of playing a series of five record-smashing 2012 dates in New Jersey, Brooklyn and London.

Audience reaction, according to Jagger in a new talk with USA Today? Zzzzzz.

Through they were the first new recordings by Jagger and Co. since 2005′s A Bigger Bang, and in many ways hearkened back to the group’s most recognizable sound and fury, those two tracks haven’t kept audiences from clamoring for workhorses like “Start Me Up” and “Satisfaction,” rather than the new stuff.

“They glumly look at you,” Jagger admits, as if to say: “‘OK, it will be over in a minute.’ It’s not a good excuse, but it’s the truth and has to be said.”

To a degree, Jagger says, even playing deep cuts from the Rolling Stones’ lengthy catalog of music — which he’s committed to inserting into the forthcoming set lists — is greeted with disdain. “You see that post: ‘I hope they do “Wild Horses,” and then we do some obscure ballad, perhaps not brilliantly. Then you see, ‘It was really good, that obscure ballad, but actually I wanted them to do “Wild Horses.”‘ We have so many ballads and we only do a couple in a show.”

The result is a band, without question the most storied of its generation to still be regularly working, that’s suddenly shy about going back into the studio to create again: “It would be nice to have a new album,” Jagger concludes, “but people don’t like the new album when you play it on stage.”

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One Comment

  1. It isn’t just The Stones. There is a used CD/record store near my house that won’t buy anything recorded after 1980 for a specific list of artists that is posted on a wall in the store. The store management said it is nearly impossible to sell stuff from those artists after that date. The Stones are on the list, as are the solo Beatles, Clapton, Yes, Genesis, Chicago, Fleetwood Mac, Allman Brothers, Eagles, James Taylor, and a whole bunch more. The owner said it’s true even with a classic like Bonnie Raitt’s Nick of Time. He had 3 copies he couldn’t get rid of but her 70s releases would go out the door almost as soon as they came in.

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