New Music Monday: David Bowie, Eric Clapton, Adrenaline Mob, Robert Hurst, Shooter Jennings

David Bowie and Eric Clapton return with albums that recall their glory years, while Shooter Jennings — both as a solo artist and as a producer with Fifth on the Floor — makes two appearances on our list.

New Music Monday also makes room for a truckload of jazz, some sizzling blues, and an avalanche of rock.

Adrenaline Mob is back with a covers album, while Robert Hurst jazzes it up with an all-star cast. There is also new music from Benoit Delbecq with Fred Hersch (employing a King Crimson-style double trio), the blues-meets-rockabilly amalgam Cash Box Kings and Dave Grohl’s Sound City Players — featuring some interesting stuff from legacy stars like Stevie Nicks, Rick Springfield and Paul McCartney.

Elsewhere, there are also new entries from Kyle Eastwood, Trent Reznor’s How to Destroy Angels, Larry Coryell, Jaleel Shaw and Joshua Kwassman, as well as a cool-rocking new blue vinyl release from Otis Redding.

And there’s more. Loads more …

ADRENALINE MOB – COVERTA (POP/ROCK): I have to admit I liked Adrenaline Mob’s debut Omerta much better than I thought I would. This follow-up is a collection of eight classic rock tunes, three of which are Ronnie James Dio-related — Dio’s “Stand up and Shout,” Rainbow’s “Kill the King” and Black Sabbath’s “The Mob Rules.” Covers collections, though, are generally only interesting for hardcore fans. — (More here.) Fred Phillips

Andrews SistersGreatest Hits in Stereo; Great Golden Hits (Vocals)
Bart WalkerWaiting on Daylight (Blues)

BENOIT DELBECQ AND FRED HERSCH DOUBLE TRIO – FUN HOUSE (JAZZ): A union of the respective trios led by Delbecq and Hersch might easily lead one to think that this is going to be a thicket of commotion at every level. Not so. It’s very striking how — with two pianos, two basses and two drums — what a spacious and airy record this is. It comes partly as a result of the main protagonists treating notes as precious natural resources, making every one of them connote a feeling. (More here.) — S. Victor Aaron

Bon JoviWhat About Now (Pop/Rock)
Bruno MarsUnorthodox Jukebox [Vinyl] (R&B)

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CASH BOX KINGS – BLACK TOPPIN’ (BLUES): The Cash Box Kings reanimate that moment when popular music — both black and white — began to coalesce into the rock ‘n’ roll aesthetic. It’s loud music, fun music, occasionally delving into darker themes, but possessing an impetuous, undeniable rhythm. Songs like “Gimme Some of That,” “Oscar’s Jump,” “Trying Really Hard” and “I Don’t Wanna Fight” sound like Chess guys doing a Sun Records session — like something you’ve heard before, but then again nothing like it. Black Toppin’ is the clearest, strongest distillation yet of their emerging “blues-a-billy” sound. (More here.) — Nick DeRiso

CourrierCathedrals Of Color (Pop/Rock)

DAVID BOWIE – THE NEXT DAY (POP/ROCK): Bowie, just when everyone was sure he had left the game for good, returns with a triumph of revision, apotheosizing his past even as he dissembles it. (Not for nothing, I don’t think, is the cover of this new album simply an obliterated version of an older one.) Hailed as a return to the dark portent of his Berlin years, when Bowie issued a trio of transfixedly disconnected, odd and dangerous projects, The Next Day is bigger than that, more complex, more fidgety. It feels by turns like a valedictory, like cutting social commentary, like a series of autobiographical sketches, like complete bullshit. In other words, it’s Bowie at his absolute best. (More here.) — Nick DeRiso

Devendra BanhartMala (Pop/Rock)
Doug MacLeodThere’s a Time (Blues)

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ERIC CLAPTON – OLD SOCK (POP/ROCK): Like 461 Ocean Boulevard, but with better singing, Eric Clapton’s Old Sock is similarly thin on original songs, swerves into an amiable island-inflected vibe, and never gets too far outside of its super-mellow box. That said, the guitarist Clapton has become, beginning with his late-1990s effort Pilgrim, a vastly improved vocalist. No matter the material, Clapton’s new-found commitment to conveying a lyric remains the most interesting thing about his more recent recordings — and Old Sock is no different. Content once just to growl and shout, Clapton has discovered a rich complexity of vocal sounds, and his albums — timid though they may often be conceptually, with nowhere near enough solo space — have become much better for it. (More here.) — Nick DeRiso

Ethel MermanMerman … Her Greatest (Vocals)

FIFTH ON THE FLOOR – ASHES AND ANGELS (POP/ROCK): The Kentucky-based Southern rockers unleash another rowdy set of tunes, this time produced by Shooter Jennings. Like their outstanding sophomore effort Dark and Bloody Ground, Ashes and Angels has a good mix of hard-driving rockers and twangy country noises. (More here.) — Fred Phillips

GenesisLamb Lies Down on Broadway [Vinyl] (Pop/Rock)

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HOW TO DESTROY ANGELS – WELCOME OBLIVION (POP/ROCK): Well, perhaps the title is appropriate, but the band should be called How to Put You to Sleep. Sorry, Trent. Hopefully the new NIN record is better. — Fred Phillips

KYLE EASTWOOD – THE VIEW FROM HERE (JAZZ): At what is presumably the midpoint of his career, Eastwood has found his groove, with jazz that might not push out to the frontiers but is damn near impossible to not like. He and his crew inject enough wrinkles and diversification to provide depth, but not so much as to leave fans of contemporary jazz behind. It’s that balance that can gain wider appeal with no compromises made. The group effort approach has certainly paid off. (More here.) — S. Victor Aaron

Larry Carlton and Robben FordUnplugged (Jazz)

LARRY CORYELL – THE LIFT (2013): The performances here are raw, a natural outcome from these being single take recordings, and the warm, vintage analog sound captured by record label founder Gregory Howe. Even more credit for that rough-and-ready sound goes to Coryell himself, whose delightfully dirty tone and broken notes are his trademark, and it’s even more ragged on The Lift. This could have been a time capsule from forty years plus ago opened up to demonstrate how Coryell used to sound like. But it isn’t; the original fusion guitarist remains as sharp and energetic today as he ever did. And you best believe this ol’ guy can still rock his ass off. (More here.) — S. Victor Aaron

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Jaimee PaulBonded: A Tribute to the Music of James Bond (Vocals)

JALEEL SHAW – THE SOUNDTRACK OF THINGS TO COME (JAZZ): A longtime member of both the Mingus Big Band and the Roy Haynes Quartet, saxophonist Jaleel Shaw had first gotten my attention as a leader with 2008?s Optimism and his ASCAP award winning song “Flipside.” His long overdue successor to Optimism is finally here, and The Soundtrack Of Things To Come features more of his standout alto and soprano sax, but it’s also a series of personal statements from the artist. We hear Shaw, with the tone of Wayne Shorter and the articulation of John Coltrane, raining down his own sheets of sound on restless numbers such as “I Wish I Didn’t Know,” “The Wheel Of Life,” and “Leel’s Tune.” But just as skillfully, Shaw can be whimsical as on the bouncy ¾-paced “Song For Sid” or meditative on “Ballerina.” (More here.) — S. Victor Aaron

Jay Willie Blues BandNew York Minute (Blues)

JOSHUA KWASSMAN – SONGS OF THE BROTHER SPIRIT (JAZZ): In these eight, often extended pieces, Kwassman’s subjugates his own role as an instrumentalist (though he flashes moments of that ability) in order to tell a story through the moody but melodic songs that flow more like a running creek than Western conventions of rhythm, but does resemble the delicate cadence Western Classical music. The folk-like melodies evoke the Brian Blade Fellowship and early Pat Metheny, but the construction of these through-composed songs also bring to mind Maria Schneider or Vince Mendoza. (More here.) — S. Victor Aaron

Junior Sisk and Ramblers ChoiceThe Story of the Day That I Died (Folk)
Mary OnettesHit the Waves (Pop/Rock)

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Maucha Adnet and Helio AlvesMilagre (Jazz)
OrianthiHeaven In This Hell (Pop/Rock)

OTIS REDDING – LONELY AND BLUE: THE DEEPEST SOUL [BLUE VINYL] (R&B): This isn’t the foot-stamping Otis, the one whose orgasmic proto-funk could bring down concert halls. This is that same guy after midnight, when the shadows — and the ghosts — start to gather. Sure, there are some familiar tracks here, but this new set digs deeper, and discovers new wells of meaning, in plucking lesser-known songs on the same love-lorn theme. A meditation on the most wrenching, soul-deep cries for love from the master of such things, Lonely and Blue illuminates Otis Redding’s way with a lyric in a manner that straight-forward greatest hits packages never have. (More here.) — Nick DeRiso

Phil PerrySay Yes (Jazz)

ROBERT HURST – BOB, A PALINDROME (JAZZ): With this seven-piece band, Hurst is able to split the difference between a proficient small ensemble and a fuller, formal large band. The layered, intelligent arrangements worthy of a jazz orchestra manifests itself on the bouncy, waltzing “3 For Lawrence,” the sophisticated harmonic development of the smooth “Little Queen,” and especially the three part, “Middle Passage Suite,” which is somewhat remindful of Duke Ellington, George Russell and Gil Evans in its grandeur and imagination. Other times, the band sounds smaller: “Picked From Nick,” with Glasper on Rhodes, has that early 70s CTI groove, while “Big Queen” is a samba but with interesting chord progressions not often heard in Brazilian music. (More here.) — S. Victor Aaron

RhyeWoman (Pop/Rock)
Stan KillianEvoke (Jazz)
Savoy BrownTrain to Nowhere (Blues)
Sena EhrhardtAll In (Blues)
Shamie RoystonPortraits (Jazz)

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SHOOTER JENNINGS – THE OTHER LIFE (COUNTRY): A companion piece to last year’s Family Man, this album is accompanied by a movie from Judd Films. More importantly, it will also include the single “Outlaw You,” which was released prior to Family Man but not included on that album. (More here.) — Fred Phillips

Southern HospitalityEasy Livin’ (Blues)
Spencer DayThe Mystery of You (Jazz)
SugarmanAfter the Blackout (Pop/Rock)
Various artistsFolk Legends [Woody Guthrie, Joan Baez, Pete Seeger, The Weavers] (Folk)
Various artistsMotown: The Musical – The Classic Songs That Inspired The Broadway Show! [Diana Ross, Marvin Gaye, Mary Wells, Four Tops, The Temptations, The Jackson 5] (R&B)

VARIOUS ARTISTS – SOUND CITY: REAL TO REEL [Dave Grohl, Brad Wilk, Stevie Nicks, Rick Springfield, Pat Smear, Rick Nielsen, Paul McCartney, Krist Novoselic, Jim Keltner, Trent Reznor] (POP/ROCK): Dave Grohl’s soundtrack to his passionately crafted film about Los Angeles’ Sound City recording studio is just as lovingly constructed, with just as many smart insights. What’s perhaps most interesting, however, is what he gets out of legacy artists — performers who’ve been around long enough to have settled personas in the public consciousness. Stevie Nicks, for instance, is coaxed into one of her toughest recent vocals on “You Can’t Fix This,” while former teen heartthrob Rick Springfield’s “Man that Never Was” is a muscular, thrillingly unmannered delight. (More here.) — Nick DeRiso

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  • kalie

    So many amazing artists collaborated on the Sound City soundtrack. I’ve heard great things about the film as well and after seeing the trailer, it’s definitely on my must watch list!

  • http://www.fransschuman.com frans #David Bowie

    His first single “Where Are We Now” was cryptic. Was he literally showing us that the bottle is empty?